Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Choosing the line of aim before going down on the shot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013

    Posts
    261
    vCash
    1000

    Default Choosing the line of aim before going down on the shot

    I remember I read a while ago that the correct technique is to choose the line of aim before you take the shot, place your right foot on the line of aim then don't adjust the line of aim while down on the shot. Despite reading that, what I have been doing is adjusting the line of aim while down on the shot. I have just been trying to the former method, not adjusting when down on the shot and it seems to work a lot better. I'm choosing the line of aim naturally while stood up then not adjusting when down. It's actually a lot more relaxing way to play, and I'm playing quicker too, without fretting. I hope that makes sense, any thoughts on this? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013

    Posts
    261
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    This explains it a bit better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiSZbeZgDrc

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013

    Posts
    261
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    I probably haven't explained it that well but it's just something that occured to me. I think before I was getting down on the shot on the right line of aim and then second guessing myself. Does that make sense, what do other people do? Do you determine the line of aim while stood up and then don't adjust that when down on the shot? I think I remember reading that you shouldn't adjust the line of aim when down on the shot and if you think it's wrong then stand up again and start your shot routine again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    This is Big Splash!'s Country Flag

    Posts
    1,956
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    Locating the true shot line is crucial but putting your cue on that shot line even more important. One of the chief reasons for ams missing is that they put the cue on a different shot line to the one they say a few feet back or the one they put their anchor foot on. This even happens to the pros but the commentators will make muppet excuses about the cloth, cushions, pockets or humidity and kicks a lot of the time when it was simply that the player messed up the shot line.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Shanghai
    This is thunder66's Country Flag

    Posts
    50
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Splash! View Post
    Locating the true shot line is crucial but putting your cue on that shot line even more important. One of the chief reasons for ams missing is that they put the cue on a different shot line to the one they say a few feet back or the one they put their anchor foot on. This even happens to the pros but the commentators will make muppet excuses about the cloth, cushions, pockets or humidity and kicks a lot of the time when it was simply that the player messed up the shot line.
    Agree.

    I find myself having to consciously put hand and elbow on the line everytime, otherwise I would tend to second guess myself when I'm down on the table.

    Aside from lean forward and dropping head straight down, is there any other technique to help putting hand or cue on the line?

    Thanks,

    -Thunder

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    This is Miig's Country Flag

    Posts
    46
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    A pool player friend of mine addresses the shot line like suggested, but when still standing up he puts his cue on the line holding the butt and laying the tip on the cloth near the cue ball. Then when the cue is already in place, he bends down to the shot. This way he has put the cue to the shot line first, so it wouldn't change when bending down.

    Don't know if it's recommended, but it works for him.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nuneaton

    Posts
    2,359
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    Stand behind the shot - select the line - fix your head on the OB - walk in with no sideways movement - drop cue down from above with bridge - put chin and chest on the cue.

    If it looks like you're on the line, start your cueing arm...

    If not, get up and begin the pre shot routine all over again.

    The hard part is... once you're down, it's all too easy to stay down even if it's wrong... Be vigilant

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013

    Posts
    261
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pottr View Post
    Stand behind the shot - select the line - fix your head on the OB - walk in with no sideways movement - drop cue down from above with bridge - put chin and chest on the cue.

    If it looks like you're on the line, start your cueing arm...

    If not, get up and begin the pre shot routine all over again.

    The hard part is... once you're down, it's all too easy to stay down even if it's wrong... Be vigilant
    Thanks for that, by fix your head on the object ball do you mean fix your eyes on the object ball as you get down to play the shot?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    This is Samcheung001's Country Flag

    Posts
    144
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    I have a problem that don't know if it also happens to others. I would sometimes hesitate on the position of my hand on the table. I would sometimes adjust it after putting down but I find the pro never done that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nuneaton

    Posts
    2,359
    vCash
    1000

    Default

    Thanks for that, by fix your head on the object ball do you mean fix your eyes on the object ball as you get down to play the shot?
    Yes

    The idea of the action is that you can replicate it... To borrow a term from Nic Barrow 'set it and forget it'

    If your head position at the pre shot stage is something that you can fold into your technique... Then why wouldn't you?
    After all, you're trying to get everything to a point that can be repeated no matter the shot type.

    I have a problem that don't know if it also happens to others. I would sometimes hesitate on the position of my hand on the table. I would sometimes adjust it after putting down but I find the pro never done that.
    Everyone who has ever picked up a cue makes similar mistakes, no matter the level they are at... The discipline comes in when you recognise this, forcing yourself to stand up on the shot and reset...

    We are human though and most of the time, we get in our own way at giving ourselves the very best chance to succeed.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •