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Thread: Timing

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    Default Timing

    When they say , he's timing the balls very well, what do they actually mean,is it acceleration through the cueball as opposed to the anathema, deceleration? How large a part does follow through play?

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    Unanswerable question, it's when you hit the ball well. Play a few hundred screw shots, at some point you will hit one well, it feels as if the cue ball wasn't even there and you get much more reaction on it, you timed that shot well.

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    "Timing" refers to the idea of having maximum cue acceleration at the point the cue tip contacts the cue ball. This is what generates spin. Follow through helps you maintain acceleration all the way to - and through - the cue ball. Without following through you will find that acceleration either completely stops or possibly becomes deceleration, which results in little-to-no action on the cue ball.

    Liang Wenbo is a good example of obvious good timing. Watch as he begins to cue, he moves the cue forward slowly to begin with, then the speed builds as it approaches the cue ball.

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    Follow through is irrelevant, and it is not acceleration that is important, rather, not decelerating.

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    Careful listening to Mr BS, he is a troll.

    Nearly all snooker coaches believe accelerating through the cue ball is very important. Watch a few vids or read a few books off some well known players. You don't have to take my word for it.

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    It as explained to me that timing is simply how long the tip is in contact with the White . If you accelerate nicely through the ball the time the tip is in contact is fractionally longer than if you hit it badly

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    Quote Originally Posted by bolty View Post
    Careful listening to Mr BS, he is a troll.

    Nearly all snooker coaches believe accelerating through the cue ball is very important. Watch a few vids or read a few books off some well known players. You don't have to take my word for it.
    Lol.

    Troll? Most snooker coaches don't have a clue what they are on about - you neither by the sounds of it. The CB cares not one jot what your follow through is like. After approx one thousandth of a second, it's gone. Twirl the cue above your head and hop on one leg if you want.

    Not decelerating at contact is more important than peak acceleration.

    All proven.

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    Timing is about acceleration, the cue needs to be accelerating at the point of contact to generate spin, the follow through is important so you don't decelerate on the shot, it's actually impossible to accelerate through the cue ball as the contact slows the cue down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello, Mr Big Shot View Post
    Lol.

    Troll? Most snooker coaches don't have a clue what they are on about - you neither by the sounds of it. The CB cares not one jot what your follow through is like. After approx one thousandth of a second, it's gone. Twirl the cue above your head and hop on one leg if you want.

    Not decelerating at contact is more important than peak acceleration.

    All proven.
    Having a follow through means the cue was accelerating when it made contact, unless you somehow stopped the cue immediately just after contact.. but where the sense or benefit in that? The idea of striking through the ball is a completely standard and observed practice in cue sports.

    I'm only saying this for other peoples benefit, as I know a numb-skull like you probably won't be able to understand.

    Just for other peoples information, Mr BS is a so called "pool player" and has admitted to have never even played snooker. Why he comes here and argues the toss with just about anyone/anything is a bit of a mystery. But obviously he's more qualified than the likes of Steve Davis, Jimmy White, Ronny O, Ray Reardon etc etc.

  10. #10
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    For me all my timing is in my grip, the cue comes through smoothly, I don't think about the speed it's going at on contact as that's all been decided before I get down, I never ever think about how far it has to come through,I'm just letting it do it's work,I might think about my swing tempo to help with letting the cue come through nicely, but it's my grip that does all the timing, when that's wrong I may as well pack up and go home. Just to add a wee thing ,I find I can get away with it a bit if I time it later but I can't do anything if I time it to early, I struggle to make a twenty break when it's like that as I either miss because I have twitched the tip a bit or the reaction is all wrong, this can creep in during match play. I haven't got a clue if that's right or wrong as everyone else seems to agree it's speed of cue and contact time on the cue ball so maybe this is just utter nonsense, it won't be the first time
    This is how you play darts ,MVG two nines in the same match!
    https://youtu.be/yqTGtwOpHu8

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