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Thread: Mental problem when trying to build breaks

  1. #1
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    This is callum from hallam's Country Flag

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    Default Mental problem when trying to build breaks

    Evening everyone, hope you're all well. Just a quick problem I have and hopefully someone could help me in resolving it. I've got good ability and am quite able potting most balls. However I really struggle to make big breaks and miss balls I would 9 times out of 10 pot. The main reason a I think this is is because of the mental pressure I put under myself in frame winning situations. I'll just be like right there's a big break on here and miss. I know people might say just don't think that but it is hard to get that thought out of my mind in a good situation. Had anyone got any tips could help me?
    REDS ARE NO GOOD WITHOUT COLOURS !

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    Try breaking it down to a set of shots that each make 25/30....no pressure on making 3 red blacks (or similar) and will help you with planning a break too.

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    The thing with that is that I'd still have that wanting of a big break in the back of my mind

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    Totally agree with you, just coming back to it myself, smashing the balls open and practicing on my own, no pressure, probably made 5or6 fifties but you get a situation playing someone and you are like.. I can't miss, this is a good oportun...oh bollox, emptying your mind, not worrying, grrr

  5. #5
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    Tbf I played yesterday abit more consistently. However I potted a few reds and blacks in a row, with the table looking perfect and I though 147 and missed. I've never made a century(only 17 and I hope with people's help it's not to far away) but I still couldn't get it out of my head

  6. #6
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    Also while I'm hear does anyone else become really irritated by just moving and walking when it's an "easy" pot. Really does annoy me and can't get it out of my head. I don't mind talking as much but still irritates me

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    If your opponent is moving when you're taking a shot you should ask them if they could not move when you're down on the shot because it puts you off. If they refuse or agree to it but then go back to the old ways I would not play them again because people around you remaining still is important on any shot. I never talk either apart from the usual "good shot" or "unlucky" and can't concentrate if my opponent is making small talk because getting in to the zone and compiling big breaks needs focus. That kind of atmosphere works with pool but for me snooker has to be in a deathly quiet room.

    A tip for improving your breakbuilding is to ramp up your practice regime and get in as much solo practice as you can. It's obvious I know but it really worked for me because when I spent months playing alone for 6 hours a day and running around the table like Billy Whizz my matchplay improved a lot. I was making 40-50 breaks a lot more consistently and my overall game changed. I went from a chancer who could never resist a long opening red to someone more careful and calculating and I started beating better players. If I had carried on like that it was only a matter of time before I hit the 100 as my practice partner had started to do but I quit playing. Funny thing is I stopped because of a bad lower back that would cause pain when I played snooker for any longer than an hour but a few years on and I think I can start playing again.

  8. #8
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    I've improved a lot recently by changing up the way I practiced. I've been practicing routines where I have to go down for the baulk colours and routines that require opening the pack. I've also been starting with a red that is either long or at least awkward. These things do a better job of prepping for match play scenarios that come up all the time. I found that before I was essentially practicing easier scenarios that only pop up once a match, if that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrRottweiler View Post
    If your opponent is moving when you're taking a shot you should ask them if they could not move when you're down on the shot because it puts you off. If they refuse or agree to it but then go back to the old ways I would not play them again because people around you remaining still is important on any shot. I never talk either apart from the usual "good shot" or "unlucky" and can't concentrate if my opponent is making small talk because getting in to the zone and compiling big breaks needs focus. That kind of atmosphere works with pool but for me snooker has to be in a deathly quiet room.

    A tip for improving your breakbuilding is to ramp up your practice regime and get in as much solo practice as you can. It's obvious I know but it really worked for me because when I spent months playing alone for 6 hours a day and running around the table like Billy Whizz my matchplay improved a lot. I was making 40-50 breaks a lot more consistently and my overall game changed. I went from a chancer who could never resist a long opening red to someone more careful and calculating and I started beating better players. If I had carried on like that it was only a matter of time before I hit the 100 as my practice partner had started to do but I quit playing. Funny thing is I stopped because of a bad lower back that would cause pain when I played snooker for any longer than an hour but a few years on and I think I can start playing again.
    Interesting so your saying solo is the key to big breaks?

    To be honest I would tend to agree with that you need to put the time in on your own and then challenge yourself maybe twice a week to a competitive match with a friend of similar or higher standard to see if what your doing is working.

    Just playing endless frames with numpties isn't any good solo beats that any day you need right person at other side of table.

  10. #10
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    As a regular century break player (I made 119 missing brown for a 141 in a league match last week) it sounds to me, from your original post, you might be lacking a certain arrogance needed. All good players have it, they don't hope to make a century they just go about doing it like it's inevitable. I certainly expect to make a ton when at 60+, even before that and when I don't, ah well I probably will next time. No sweat

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