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Thread: Who's used this?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by vmax View Post
    Keep it up and you'll be rewarded. When I'm in the zone (rarely) I do this without thinking and I don't miss until I realise what I'm doing, then self 1 has a little word with me and I look but don't see. Got to keep him quiet that self 1 as he's always interfereing.
    A few years ago I attended evening classes in practical philosophy. Although it failed me miserably in many things it has taught me that " the zone" is a state of being and can be achieved through practice in every normal day activity. Simply start by taking a deep breath and say to yourself " ok, there is nowhere else to be and nothing else to do than being here now and then simply focus on the task. Whether it be doing the dishes, making the bed or whatever it may be. Also remind yourself that the task is always more important than your thoughts about it. You don't have to like it, you just have to do it. Over time you will live your life with more focused awareness, in other words more "in the zone.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rimmer10 View Post
    A few years ago I attended evening classes in practical philosophy. Although it failed me miserably in many things it has taught me that " the zone" is a state of being and can be achieved through practice in every normal day activity. Simply start by taking a deep breath and say to yourself " ok, there is nowhere else to be and nothing else to do than being here now and then simply focus on the task. Whether it be doing the dishes, making the bed or whatever it may be. Also remind yourself that the task is always more important than your thoughts about it. You don't have to like it, you just have to do it. Over time you will live your life with more focused awareness, in other words more "in the zone.
    That's great advice, I'm like this at work, simply get on with it without conscious thought about what I'm doing and the day dissapears. The one time I made a total clearance in practise I was in this state, a vital point in my life that was on my mind took away any thought I had about snooker and it all happened on its own.
    When I won our first division 8 ball singles I was secretary of the league and was being lambasted for fixing the draw to reach the final; fact is I very nearly didn't bother with my half of the play off to the final but had to as I was the referee for all the other matches.
    I was told that the other bloke had beaten all the leagues best players in the other half of the draw and that he would hammer me as well, I broke the balls in the first frame (best of 5) and my mate went to the bar to get me a pint, came back and asked how I was getting on and I told him I had won, "first frame" he said, "no 3-0" I said and I didn't miss a ball.
    I was not at all concerned about the final on the night as I had been playing snooker for about a year and my pool had improved massively and I guess on a subconscious level I knew I was going to prove everyone wrong and self 2 very calmly went about it without any prompting from self 1.

    I quit pool very soon after and concentrated on snooker, reached a level where I was getting at least one 50+ break a week but reached an impasse and started tinkering with my technique after a remark made to me by a very good player that I played too fast. I started by slowing down and then went through various grips, stances etc and as a result I've forgotten everything I used to do and self 1 is now in charge nearly all the time which is why I now tell people to simply look where you should and let everything else fall into place naturally, and if it doesn't then take up knitting

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by vmax View Post
    That's great advice, I'm like this at work, simply get on with it without conscious thought about what I'm doing and the day dissapears. The one time I made a total clearance in practise I was in this state, a vital point in my life that was on my mind took away any thought I had about snooker and it all happened on its own.
    When I won our first division 8 ball singles I was secretary of the league and was being lambasted for fixing the draw to reach the final; fact is I very nearly didn't bother with my half of the play off to the final but had to as I was the referee for all the other matches.
    I was told that the other bloke had beaten all the leagues best players in the other half of the draw and that he would hammer me as well, I broke the balls in the first frame (best of 5) and my mate went to the bar to get me a pint, came back and asked how I was getting on and I told him I had won, "first frame" he said, "no 3-0" I said and I didn't miss a ball.
    I was not at all concerned about the final on the night as I had been playing snooker for about a year and my pool had improved massively and I guess on a subconscious level I knew I was going to prove everyone wrong and self 2 very calmly went about it without any prompting from self 1.

    I quit pool very soon after and concentrated on snooker, reached a level where I was getting at least one 50+ break a week but reached an impasse and started tinkering with my technique after a remark made to me by a very good player that I played too fast. I started by slowing down and then went through various grips, stances etc and as a result I've forgotten everything I used to do and self 1 is now in charge nearly all the time which is why I now tell people to simply look where you should and let everything else fall into place naturally, and if it doesn't then take up knitting
    great story V max, we all have experience of being in the zone. I used to sprint at County level and whenever I performed best I used to get tunnel vision and couldn't hear a thing (after the gun).
    It's the same with snooker, I played pretty rubbish by my standard last season and realised I'm not allowing myself to concentrate fully, i'm not entering 'the zone'. Easily distracted and not fully committed.
    I aim this season to completely block out anything other than my snooker whenever i'm practising or in a match. I find that when i'm not in the zone I worry about what my opponents are doing and struggle with my own game.

    I think part of the problem for me is I've found myself stuck at a certain level. I've made hundreds, i've won the town championship, can compete with many of the top amateurs but don't have that desire to
    push myself as far as I can go. I don't get that same enjoyment out of beating lesser players but don't feel the urge to play with the better players like I used to. Tricky one.

    Anyway back to aiming and Vmax's comment about looking where you aim. This has a certain amount of truth to it. All this 'ghost ball' and 'aiming system' stuff is over the top for me. I just think stand behind the shot, look where you
    need to hit the object ball in order to make it go where you want it to go,then get down on the shot and cue the cue ball so that the cue ball hits the OB in the correct spot. Now if you can't hit the OB in the correct spot practice and practice
    until you can. It really isn't rocket science, there's an element of natural ability and appreciation for angles that probably can't be taught but it can be honed with hours of practice.

    e.g I kept missing pinks to the middle, I went down the club and must've played 200 in a row until it became an automatic shot. Now when I get down I know i'll pot it. People seem to want quick fixes however what you really need
    is repetition and practice. If after this you can't do it then it may be best to accept that you're of limited ability and perhaps not blessed with natural ability.
    "just tap it in"

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomwalker147 View Post
    great story V max, we all have experience of being in the zone. I used to sprint at County level and whenever I performed best I used to get tunnel vision and couldn't hear a thing (after the gun).
    It's the same with snooker, I played pretty rubbish by my standard last season and realised I'm not allowing myself to concentrate fully, i'm not entering 'the zone'. Easily distracted and not fully committed.
    I aim this season to completely block out anything other than my snooker whenever i'm practising or in a match. I find that when i'm not in the zone I worry about what my opponents are doing and struggle with my own game.

    I think part of the problem for me is I've found myself stuck at a certain level. I've made hundreds, i've won the town championship, can compete with many of the top amateurs but don't have that desire to
    push myself as far as I can go. I don't get that same enjoyment out of beating lesser players but don't feel the urge to play with the better players like I used to. Tricky one.

    Anyway back to aiming and Vmax's comment about looking where you aim. This has a certain amount of truth to it. All this 'ghost ball' and 'aiming system' stuff is over the top for me. I just think stand behind the shot, look where you
    need to hit the object ball in order to make it go where you want it to go,then get down on the shot and cue the cue ball so that the cue ball hits the OB in the correct spot. Now if you can't hit the OB in the correct spot practice and practice
    until you can. It really isn't rocket science, there's an element of natural ability and appreciation for angles that probably can't be taught but it can be honed with hours of practice.

    e.g I kept missing pinks to the middle, I went down the club and must've played 200 in a row until it became an automatic shot. Now when I get down I know i'll pot it. People seem to want quick fixes however what you really need
    is repetition and practice. If after this you can't do it then it may be best to accept that you're of limited ability and perhaps not blessed with natural ability.
    I agree Tom, I had a practise this lunchtime and was my usual hit and miss then I realised that I wasn't seeing the contact point before getting down into my stance, therefore I was always slightly in the wrong place and was cueing across the ball.
    When I did it I didn't miss a single ball, when I lapsed and simply looked in the direction of the object ball before getting down I missed every time.
    I know I wasn't really concentrating, I'm on holiday at the mo and the weather is stopping me from riding and snooker was just something to pass the time 'til the threat of rain dissapears.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomwalker147 View Post
    Anyway back to aiming and Vmax's comment about looking where you aim. This has a certain amount of truth to it. All this 'ghost ball' and 'aiming system' stuff is over the top for me. I just think stand behind the shot, look where you
    need to hit the object ball in order to make it go where you want it to go,then get down on the shot and cue the cue ball so that the cue ball hits the OB in the correct spot. Now if you can't hit the OB in the correct spot practice and practice
    until you can. It really isn't rocket science, there's an element of natural ability and appreciation for angles that probably can't be taught but it can be honed with hours of practice.

    e.g I kept missing pinks to the middle, I went down the club and must've played 200 in a row until it became an automatic shot. Now when I get down I know i'll pot it. People seem to want quick fixes however what you really need
    is repetition and practice. If after this you can't do it then it may be best to accept that you're of limited ability and perhaps not blessed with natural ability.
    Hi all,

    I agree with most of these points Tom. I always teach for people to stand behind the object ball and find the point of contact and point of aim. The trouble is, some people can't visualise the point of aim and most people only see the point of contact. The ghost ball potting aid will help someone visualise that, and it can be used during the shot until someone get used to seeing it. It still needs good knowledge of the game, straight cueing and a heap of practice! I (and I hope other genuine people) don't confess these to be quick fixes, merely a help in the beginning and adjustment phase of getting you to the 100+ breaks rather than on 50+ breaks. (I'm not suggesting that you'd need the potting aid if you make 100+ breaks by the way!).
    Practice is the best form, but practice makes permanent - so all these training aids are to make sure you practice perfectly.
    Hope you're all well!
    I would love to welcome this type of discussion on my new forum on Facebook if you would like to join:
    facebook.com/groups/cuezonepodcast
    Keep playing!
    Best wishes,
    Rob

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