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Thread: What's the correct distance when addressing the cue ball?

  1. #1
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    Default What's the correct distance when addressing the cue ball?

    Hi all,

    I am concerned i'm not hitting the cue ball in the centre, I was wondering if i am not the correct distance from the cue ball and should the distance change depending on how hard i want to hit the ball. I'm missing lots of easy shots.

    Thanks
    Richie

  2. #2
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    Hi, this often depends on the length of your action, height, etc. Here's a simple self check method using the 'D' and balk line as a guide. I will say typically a lot here because it's very much down to seeing how you address the ball but this should help get you started.

    Place the cue ball on the brown spot as though you are going to hit it up and down the spots and get down into your address position. Look at where the 'V' of your bridge is. If it is inside the 'D', your bridge is distance is ok (around 8-10" is typical). Any longer and you are possibly creating a pivot point with your 'V' and pushing the cue across the line rather than using it as a means of pushing the cue along the line. Typically, the longer the bribe, the more chance you have of pushing the cue off line.

    To get a clear idea of what I mean here, use the rest and see how much more difficult it is to cue straight if you bring the rest head nearer to you, lengthening the distance from tip to rest head. It instantly creates more chance of pushing the cue off line, ales the shots harder and feels very odd.

    I hope that this helps a little. Obviously I've said all of this without seeing you play so take that into account when you try this but hopefully it at least explains what can go wrong if your bridge length is too long.

    Simon

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    That was baulk line, by the way

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    and finally, *bribe is bridge *ales is makes and that's the last time I post using an iPad......

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    how about the distance of the tip to the cue ball?
    I have about 1/4in gap when my cueing forearm is vertical.
    the "brown on sport - D test" is a good one
    Many years ago I used to be way too far back, brought my bridge hand in, reduced the distance of cue ball to tip, and now feel much more compact and solid; also my bridge arm is much more relaxed with a comfortable slight bend at the elbow
    Up the TSF!

  6. #6
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    Its an interesting one. Tip to cue ball is not something we can actually see at address so only practice and asking another player really enables you to gauge the distance you are at. If your cue arm is vertical and you are 1/4" away from the white (6 and a bit mm) then that is pretty much spot on, though under pressure you might occasionally accidentally feather the white but practice will help show, then resolve this by making small adjustments.

    Again it goes back to solid foundations, a compact technique with solid basics, all the points of contact (I call it 3 and 3) in place your tip-cue ball distance will also be consistent and so will your strike. the bridge arm bend also allows you to make distance adjustments without compromising your action too much.

    Hope this helps.

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    just to add/explain what I mean by 3 and 3:

    We have 3 connections to our surroundings - left and right foot and bridge hand - that can all be self checked once you have the basic technique.

    We also have 3 connections to our body - grip, bridge and contact point on the chest where the cue runs when playing the stroke.

    Checking these regularly in practice for alignment and consistency gives us confidence in our technique and also enables us to break the elements down to work out what's going on if problems arise.

    Hope that makes sense.

  8. #8
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    8-12 inches is normal range. 8 inches is more forgiving but harder to generate spin. 12 inches is harder to control but easier to generate spin. Lots of players are more compact in the balls and longer at distance. Marc Allen is compact in the balls and at distance, I'd guess less than 8 inches in the balls and seems to get plenty of action, so there's no hard and fast rules really

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