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2 x John Parris Traditional Cues

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  • 2 x John Parris Traditional Cues

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    Last edited by FMeister; 5th April 2019, 10:01 PM.

  • #2
    Nice cues
    Current playing cue Trevor White
    3/4 ash cue

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    • #3
      I have seen niche and omin hunter shafts that make this one look like a plain jane. But snooker cues as with most things is all about brand snobbery

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sanman View Post
        I have seen niche and omin hunter shafts that make this one look like a plain jane. But snooker cues as with most things is all about brand snobbery
        True, but aesthetics of the shaft don't mean much when the shaft could play like a brick. Hence the OTT premium for "ultimate" grade shafts...and to be fair some of them can look very average.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by narl View Post
          True, but aesthetics of the shaft don't mean much when the shaft could play like a brick. Hence the OTT premium for "ultimate" grade shafts...and to be fair some of them can look very average.
          when you buying a Ultimate cue you ain't paying for anything other than aesthetics mate. What I see coming out of Parris shed called Ultimate is hardly more than standard fare in Thailand.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sanman View Post
            when you buying a Ultimate cue you ain't paying for anything other than aesthetics mate. What I see coming out of Parris shed called Ultimate is hardly more than standard fare in Thailand.
            Yes that's how it will always be as far as parris cues they carry clout and that's why they sell for good money
            Current playing cue Trevor White
            3/4 ash cue

            Comment


            • #7
              Wood from the far east have a tendency to retain more moisture as the humidity levels are very high - the drying process can differ vastly which in turn has an effect on how they play. Yes, aesthetics of the wood do play some part, visually, and can also be argued somewhat in playability terms (even growth distribution). Parris Cues sourcing their woods from much dryer environments i.e. UK ensures that the wood is effectively dried especially using the process of tapering the shaft at regular stages allowing the shaft to settle. My personal experience of the Ultimate range is that they example prime craftsmanship both visually and in playing terms. You may get the odd one that lacks this, but wood is a living thing.

              I might come across as an advocate for Parris cues but can only speak from personal experience but even so, there is a reason why most top professionals use Parris Cues.

              Comment


              • #8
                gosh. You actually believe in all of that. By the way wood ain't a living thing. its dead. Its organic yes but hell yeah its dead as can be. Also wood once kiln dried varies very little from climate to climate in terms of their moisture content. Also consider that once a cue is made its been oiled or should have been. The result is that the oil protects the wood and also prevents moisture from displacing it. another thing is most people also taper their shafts progressively before finishing of their cues. Its not something unique to JP. as for his craftsmanship I don't know how he got a reputation from some as being a premier cuemaker but he cannot tie mike woolridges (amongst English cuemakers) shoelaces. his splices are rarely even. Like stevie said his cues carry clout and as far as I can see its cos he sponsors professionals which is where he gains a rep from. This rep is not in my opinion deserved. Their are far better out there for the silly money being asked for his cues.
                Originally posted by FMeister View Post
                Wood from the far east have a tendency to retain more moisture as the humidity levels are very high - the drying process can differ vastly which in turn has an effect on how they play. Yes, aesthetics of the wood do play some part, visually, and can also be argued somewhat in playability terms (even growth distribution). Parris Cues sourcing their woods from much dryer environments i.e. UK ensures that the wood is effectively dried especially using the process of tapering the shaft at regular stages allowing the shaft to settle. My personal experience of the Ultimate range is that they example prime craftsmanship both visually and in playing terms. You may get the odd one that lacks this, but wood is a living thing.

                I might come across as an advocate for Parris cues but can only speak from personal experience but even so, there is a reason why most top professionals use Parris Cues.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well they didn't last long, again the "ronnie" connection shines through.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Seems I may have unwittingly touched a nerve. Wood can be considered as a living thing when its part of a tree but I think you took it literally and I agree that wood is not considered to be a living thing once its cut down. Moisture content within wood does have an effect on the wood, as fibres are loosened excessively and when kiln dried, it does have a different internal hardening structure. We may need to start a new thread discussing this but I personally think we should give it a miss! I'm happy that you agree that the shafts should be tapered gradually which does confirm that Parris Cues are using the correct process. Quite simply, Parris cues have gained their reputation, which I'm sure everyone is aware of, that most of the top professionals do use his cues. It's not that they haven't used other cuemakers cues. Many professional players have tried other cues, Judd to be one of the last, who played with another cuemakers cue for a season, but then reverted back to Parris to make him a new cue, and it is clear his gameplay is on a totally different level from what it was before. I personally have seen cues that have been made specifically for Ronnie, but again he settled with a JP cue. After all, they are striving to be the best and any tool that could give them the edge, quite simply they will use. This quite clearly shows that JP's cues have to be ranked amongst the highest.

                    What we can agree on, is what Stevie mentioned, is JP's cues do carry clout, but that's because of the reasons mentioned above, and Stevie (apologies in advance, I hope he doesn't mind me saying) did enquire about purchasing one of the cues mentioned for sale at the beginning of the thread.

                    Anyway, different schools of thought will always remain. And I for one, speaking from personal experience, that the service quality received from JP is second to none. There maybe cases where people have not been entirely happy - but these are probably due to reasons that are unknown to me. I have used cues from many of the cuemakers that I consider to be the top cuemakers and my personal opinion once again, is as stated above.


                    Originally posted by sanman View Post
                    gosh. You actually believe in all of that. By the way wood ain't a living thing. its dead. Its organic yes but hell yeah its dead as can be. Also wood once kiln dried varies very little from climate to climate in terms of their moisture content. Also consider that once a cue is made its been oiled or should have been. The result is that the oil protects the wood and also prevents moisture from displacing it. another thing is most people also taper their shafts progressively before finishing of their cues. Its not something unique to JP. as for his craftsmanship I don't know how he got a reputation from some as being a premier cuemaker but he cannot tie mike woolridges (amongst English cuemakers) shoelaces. his splices are rarely even. Like stevie said his cues carry clout and as far as I can see its cos he sponsors professionals which is where he gains a rep from. This rep is not in my opinion deserved. Their are far better out there for the silly money being asked for his cues.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I must admit, they are very nice playing cues

                      Originally posted by narl View Post
                      Well they didn't last long, again the "ronnie" connection shines through.

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