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  • Cue Oil selected

    Hi guys:
    My new Johnparris cue is coming soon,I wanted to take good care of this cue.
    So could anyone tell me when should I use the cue oil ,and I have 3 kinds cue oils, they're Johnparris oil,Mike oil,Liberon linseed oil.which one is the best for my new cue.
    Thanks a lot!!!

  • #2
    Shouldn't need any .......damp rag and buff dry .
    Still trying to pot as many balls as i can !

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    • #3
      Originally posted by stevexbxyf View Post
      Hi guys:
      My new Johnparris cue is coming soon,I wanted to take good care of this cue.
      So could anyone tell me when should I use the cue oil ,and I have 3 kinds cue oils, they're Johnparris oil,Mike oil,Liberon linseed oil.which one is the best for my new cue.
      Thanks a lot!!!
      You shouldn't need to oil your cue unless you've worn the original finish over time, but out of the 3 Mike's will be the best. Raw linseed isn't the most hardwearing or moisture resistant finish, Liberon finishing oil is very good or use Danish oil or even a blend of boiled linseed and tung oil

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dave Walton View Post
        You shouldn't need to oil your cue unless you've worn the original finish over time, but out of the 3 Mike's will be the best. Raw linseed isn't the most hardwearing or moisture resistant finish, Liberon finishing oil is very good or use Danish oil or even a blend of boiled linseed and tung oil
        I'm abit confused. Isn't raw linseed oil recommended over boiled?
        The bitter taste of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Wayne G View Post
          Originally posted by Dave Walton View Post
          You shouldn't need to oil your cue unless you've worn the original finish over time, but out of the 3 Mike's will be the best. Raw linseed isn't the most hardwearing or moisture resistant finish, Liberon finishing oil is very good or use Danish oil or even a blend of boiled linseed and tung oil
          I'm abit confused. Isn't raw linseed oil recommended over boiled?
          Some say use raw rather than boiled, with the reasoning being, the driers damage the wood, which imo is nonsense. Boiled gives a more protective finish.

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          • #6
            If you have bought a cue from John Parris and also got a bottle of cue oil from him I'd be inclined to use that.

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            • #7
              pjur women bodyglide an feel every stroke

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wayne G View Post
                I'm abit confused. Isn't raw linseed oil recommended over boiled?
                Yes. Falsely.

                It is a non drying oil.

                Sure, it won't hurt, as most oils won't hurt but if you google raw linseed oil for use in finishing in any form you will find every woodworking professional there has ever been says it is not to be used as a finish. And certainly not over an existing finish.

                But like I said, it won't hurt. As long as you wipe it all off the surface, it won't get on your hands.
                The Cuefather.

                info@handmadecues.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dave Walton View Post
                  Some say use raw rather than boiled, with the reasoning being, the driers damage the wood, which imo is nonsense.
                  Not just your opinion Dave, every other woodworking industry agrees.

                  Boiled linseed is simply raw linseed modified to actually do what it needs it to do to be properly useful.

                  And that is to dry as a finish on wood.

                  It should be noted that, eventually, raw will 'dry' to a degree but we are talking a loooong time, weeks/months, not hours/days.
                  The Cuefather.

                  info@handmadecues.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MikeWooldridge View Post
                    Originally posted by Dave Walton View Post
                    Some say use raw rather than boiled, with the reasoning being, the driers damage the wood, which imo is nonsense.
                    Not just your opinion Dave, every other woodworking industry agrees.

                    Boiled linseed is simply raw linseed modified to actually do what it needs it to do to be properly useful.

                    And that is to dry as a finish on wood.

                    It should be noted that, eventually, raw will 'dry' to a degree but we are talking a loooong time, weeks/months, not hours/days.
                    There you have it from the master himself

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