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carboot billiards balls ivory ?

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  • carboot billiards balls ivory ?

    are the balls ivory

  • #2
    I would say "ox bone"
    Up the TSF!

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    • #3
      Ivory balls often have a black dot visible on the white, which is the root of the tusk. Otherwise, you could look at the shape, as ivory balls can move over time, and go off round. Also, there can sometimes be quite a large variation betweens weight within a set, due to natural density differences.

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      • #4
        Ivory has a grain to it like wood so If they're ivory then the red will have a darker stripe around it where the dye seeps into the grain more than the rest of the material.
        Speak up, you've got to speak up against the madness, you've got speak your mind if you dare
        but don't try to get yourself elected, for if you do you'll have to cut your hair

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        • #5
          Ashcroft was awarded the first Gold Award in 1886 and had the 2 gold awards by 1905, not sure precisely when the 2nd was awarded; so I would say the balls are what you think they are
          Up the TSF!

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          • #6
            Are these not worth quite a considerable amount ? Or are you not able to sell them ?
            Still trying to pot as many balls as i can !

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Neil Taperell View Post
              Are these not worth quite a considerable amount ? Or are you not able to sell them ?
              hence "ox bone" comment
              but would be wary
              maybe check online for guidelines, as these are probably close to 1905 they maybe allowed being that old, but the guidelines recently changed, so check.
              Up the TSF!

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              • #8
                They are not ivory. They are an early composition material. You can tell by the pattern of cracking.

                The box was made between the wars, before 1933 when the postcode changes, so most likely from the 1920s.
                Last edited by 100-uper; 14th January 2020, 01:37 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 100-uper View Post
                  They are not ivory. They are an early composition material. You can tell by the pattern of cracking.
                  really, I thought that was the grain

                  on a side question, do you know when Ashcroft got the 2nd award?
                  Up the TSF!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DeanH View Post

                    really, I thought that was the grain

                    on a side question, do you know when Ashcroft got the 2nd award?
                    Both gold medals were awarded at the 1886 Liverpool International Exhibition. One medal was "for billiard tables" the other "for artistic furniture."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 100-uper View Post

                      Both gold medals were awarded at the 1886 Liverpool International Exhibition. One medal was "for billiard tables" the other "for artistic furniture."
                      ah ha, thanks
                      Up the TSF!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 100-uper View Post
                        They are not ivory. They are an early composition material. You can tell by the pattern of cracking.

                        The box was made between the wars, before 1933 when the postcode changes, so most likely from the 1920s.
                        You beat me to it! Ivory has a sort of cross hatching that is fairly distinctive.
                        https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/adr147

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