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Cushion / rail height

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  • Renegade_56
    replied
    Well if there would be hardly any bounce by the ball hitting an edge, then how do balls bounce off of american cushions where there is nothing except edge to hit? The reason for 2/3 of ball diameter is to hinder the ball bouncing when it impacts the cushion at speed. If the ball hits an edge it's force would be minimized less (less surface contact), and with good rubber, have ample rebound, as opposed to hitting flatly into a cushion face. If that is correct it explains why you don't see alot of bank shots in UK Snooker.

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  • Geoff Large
    replied
    Originally Posted by Renegade_56 View Post
    Rule of thumb on american pool tables is 2/3 of ball diameter. So with 2 1/16" balls used in the UK mostly, the measurement would be about 1 3/8" from the slate, up to the bottom edge of the block rail it would seem.
    American Pool rubber is triangular , English Billiard rubber is L shaped with a flat face edge , the bottom of this face should make contact just above centre of a ball , at 1 3/8ths the to bottom edge a 2 1/16th ball would be well under the rubber and hardly any bounce .

    Geoff

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  • Renegade_56
    replied
    Rule of thumb on american pool tables is 2/3 of ball diameter. So with 2 1/16" balls used in the UK mostly, the measurement would be about 1 3/8" from the slate, up to the bottom edge of the block rail it would seem.

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  • bwls730
    replied
    Or put it this way, should the function of the cushion be slowing down the balls? or should it bonuce the balls off as close to the impact speed as possible?

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  • nrage
    replied
    Originally Posted by bwls730 View Post
    May I ask if you have a perfect cushion and fitted perfectly, should the ball bounce off with the same speed before the impact, or should the ball slow down a fraction? (assuming no spin on the ball) I understand this is the most ideal case, but I often ask the same question but have different opinions. Thank you.
    It is physically impossible for it to bounce off with *exactly* the same speed. The kinetic energy of the ball is converted into heat and sound, plus expended to compress the rubber. The rubber returns most of the energy to the ball as it sends it on it's way, but some can also be lost if the rubber is not uniform and it's redirected in a less exact direction.

    The real Q you have to ask is how much speed is lost due to the collision, and you can probably sensibly measure that as a percentage of the original speed. Hmm, I wonder if the amount of speed lost vs the speed of the ball is linear, or if more or less is lost at high/low speeds.

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  • bwls730
    replied
    May I ask if you have a perfect cushion and fitted perfectly, should the ball bounce off with the same speed before the impact, or should the ball slow down a fraction? (assuming no spin on the ball) I understand this is the most ideal case, but I often ask the same question but have different opinions. Thank you.

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  • barking
    replied
    nose height

    in billiards and some other specs they use a % of ball diameter to remove variables in height. 62-63.5 % or something in carom i believe.

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  • nideKer
    replied
    Here I've put all templates from this topic...

    http://www.nideker.narod.ru/staff/tamplates.tsf.zip

    Enjoy it! :snooker:

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  • hsn
    replied
    Can any one plz reupload these images as the links do not work any more. thank you.

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  • nideKer
    replied
    thanks moglet it`s that what I have searched!
    If you not against - I post these photos in my blog?

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  • moglet
    replied
    These photos are of an old set waiting to be re-lined and rubbered:








    Last edited by moglet; 11 August 2009, 09:01 PM.

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  • nideKer
    replied
    In actuality I need just a picture of the end of the rail, for imagine how it look - and will "inven" something same. It can be with, or without steel bar ...

    Geoff if You can`t post a picture - You can send by E-mail to me this picts ... and I`ll post theirs... =)

    thx a lot!
    Last edited by nideKer; 10 April 2009, 11:25 AM.

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  • Geoff Large
    replied
    well you are getting into more technical stuff trying to use steel block cushions , I doubt if you could make these youreself ( put it this way I could not make them, I can only put parts together allready sourced for steels ), the cushions differ from normal cushions in that the slip that holds the colth in is on the reverse of the block , on a normal cushion it is on the top , and the cushion is in one piece .

    the cushion is in two parts realy , the steel with block and rubber attached and covered is bolted to the slate , and the capping suround which bolts to the back of the steel plate.

    It would be better for you to just make standard cushions .

    Good picture's though and one that shows the slide in panel covering the cushion bolt hole's which will be of use to Mike P and his pocket problem . If mike is reading this I think his cushions have had the bottom moulding planed down past the bottom slot then buttons put over the Bolt holes , but with the main body being Scotch pine it shows this lower priced wood without the panel to hide it .
    wish I could post picture's , I'm not too good on a PC .

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  • nideKer
    replied
    Geoff thanks for the so interesting information for me! It you`ll not find in the Internet!

    Geoff
    I neen too also information about construction of the end of the rail (near pokcet) - where rubber is attached to the block.

    something like this:




    or this:




    But I interesting exactly a structure of the rail whis steel cushion block.

    Can you help me whis some information (or better some photos... )?

    Thx a lot! :snooker:

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  • Geoff Large
    replied
    you can use a small banded belt sander to form the curved corner or middle angle that the block that the rubber sits on and also the rubber when it is attached to the block , it is not the professional fitters way of doing it , but for someone who is not trained then there is less of a risk of taking too much rubber off .
    Cutting with the leather knife lubricated with water and you have the risk of cutting too much rubber off . you have to have a steady hand , and you must also practice a few times to feel confident to go ahead and cutt the rubber . always make a template up , a corner template and a middle template , put template on top of the rubber and draw a line around it , try and cutt the rubber as close to the line but not within it , then sand with rough sand paper progressing to smoother paper , the undercutt is simular use a rasp and then finnish off with sand paper .
    Take a look at Elston & hopkin web site ( www.elstonandhopkin.co.uk ) and look at the picture where it says rerubber , that is my hand with the rasp on the picture . this will give you a good idea how to form the angle .

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