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Canadian Snooker Table: CanadaBilliards or Olhausen?

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  • Canadian Snooker Table: CanadaBilliards or Olhausen?

    I know this is primarily a UK site, but I'm sure a lot of people are either in NA or have an opinion.

    After much debate with SWMBO, we have decided on a 5x10 snooker table. A 6x12 would have had 46" on each side and 50" at each end, with unlimited side clearance from the blue down to the black end, and it was felt that changing cues all the time would get old fast.

    So the question is, which, if either is better: Olhausen or CanadaBilliards.

    thank you for your input

  • #2
    Hello there. I have been playing snooker on and off for 30 years, and I recently returned to Canada from abroad and purchased a Canada Billiards Supreme snooker table.
    I wanted a Joy Chinese 8-ball table (much cheaper, better made and closer to a proper snooker table, in my opinion), but only have a room big enough for a 8'x4' table,
    and the Joy tables only come in 4.5'x9'. From what I have heard, direct from the distributor, Olhausen does not make snooker tables, per-se, but rather shaves the cushions
    of its pool tables to make them appear similar to snooker tables. Canada Billiard, on the other hand, does install proper snooker rails, cushions and pockets. My table cost
    me $10,000 with tax, and I was pleased with the table; however, the fitting was appalling. The fitter did a sloppy job on the pockets (the cloth, wood and leather are not
    flush), installed the middle pockets at inconsistent heights, and literally cut a chunk of leather off one of the middle pockets. Canada Billiard has been good about offering me
    new pockets and rails, no charge, however I have to wait until March to get them. Play-wise, the table is fine. It does not have steel-block cushions though, which one might
    expect for the price. Have you considered a 4.5'x9' Chinese 8-ball table? Check out the website for Joy Billiards. They are more similar to proper snooker tables, in my opinion,
    than are the Canada Billiard tables. Cheers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Another thing I should add about the Canada Billiard table, is that I had to pay extra to have the table made without sights on the rails. If you don't ask for that,
      your snooker table will arrive with sights on the rails, as all the pieces are mass produced and most customers in North America buy pool tables.

      Comment


      • #4
        Canadian Snooker Table: CanadaBilliards or Olhausen?

        "sights on the rails"
        can you explain this please
        Up the TSF!

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry, perhaps that was not the correct choice of words. I just meant the three diamonds or dot marks that are
          embedded in the surface of the wooden rails. Snooker tables typically do not have them, but pool tables do, at
          least in my experience.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally Posted by Danos View Post
            Sorry, perhaps that was not the correct choice of words. I just meant the three diamonds or dot marks that are
            embedded in the surface of the wooden rails. Snooker tables typically do not have them, but pool tables do, at
            least in my experience.
            Some old English tables have these, a couple of the thurstons tables at my club have small ivory or possibly mother of pearl spots about 5mm dia, spaced two per rail I think.
            sigpicNo cheap shots...well maybe the odd one if its funny...

            Comment


            • #7
              That's interesting. I've never played on an English table that has them. The old Brunswick tables I played on as a teenager had them,
              but I think those tables are/were made in the US, so I always figured it was an American thing. I'm not sure if they help with playing
              snooker, but I never liked the look of them on a snooker table

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally Posted by Danos View Post
                Sorry, perhaps that was not the correct choice of words. I just meant the three diamonds or dot marks that are
                embedded in the surface of the wooden rails. Snooker tables typically do not have them, but pool tables do, at
                least in my experience.
                I thought that was what you meant, thanks for the confirmation

                Originally Posted by Cue crafty View Post
                Some old English tables have these, a couple of the thurstons tables at my club have small ivory or possibly mother of pearl spots about 5mm dia, spaced two per rail I think.
                I asked GeoffL about these but don't think he replied; one of the tables down my club has white (ivory) spots, and one has black (ebony) spots embedded in the rails, to me they are not "sighting spots" but seem to be aligned with the longitudinal centre line, and also where the baulk line and the pink spot are. Maybe as quick reference for the cloth fitter
                Last edited by DeanH; 11th January 2019, 11:23 AM.
                Up the TSF!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Dean. I agree, that "sights" seems strange. I've always wondered, "How do you use these to 'sight up' a shot, anyways?" To me,
                  the only points of reference used when playing a shot are the cue ball, object ball, and exact spot you're aiming for, whether that
                  be a point on the cushion, a pocket, and so on. I've never understood how other reference points (i.e. sights on the rails) come into
                  play or help in any way. However, here in North America, these diamond and spot marks are indeed referred to as rail sights. Perhaps
                  the term "sight" has a different meaning, as you suggest, for the cloth fitter. Maybe some pool players will know how these things
                  work, or if they are indeed even necessary and not just cosmetic.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally Posted by Danos View Post
                    Hi Dean. I agree, that "sights" seems strange. I've always wondered, "How do you use these to 'sight up' a shot, anyways?" To me,
                    the only points of reference used when playing a shot are the cue ball, object ball, and exact spot you're aiming for, whether that
                    be a point on the cushion, a pocket, and so on. I've never understood how other reference points (i.e. sights on the rails) come into
                    play or help in any way. However, here in North America, these diamond and spot marks are indeed referred to as rail sights. Perhaps
                    the term "sight" has a different meaning, as you suggest, for the cloth fitter. Maybe some pool players will know how these things
                    work, or if they are indeed even necessary and not just cosmetic.
                    Found some useful info here :-

                    https://www.libertygames.co.uk/pool-diamond-system/
                    sigpicNo cheap shots...well maybe the odd one if its funny...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [/QUOTE=DeanH;972489] I asked GeoffL about these but don't think he replied; one of the tables down my club has white (ivory) spots, and one has black (ebony) spots embedded in the rails, to me they are not "sighting spots" but seem to be aligned with the longitudinal centre line, and also where the baulk line and the pink spot are. Maybe as quick reference for the cloth fitter [/QUOTE]

                      I'd be interested to know Dean if you ever find out.
                      Last edited by Cue crafty; 11th January 2019, 03:42 PM.
                      sigpicNo cheap shots...well maybe the odd one if its funny...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I never did, and the two tables at the club mentioned earlier have now had new rails added by Thurston, so I cant check, but I am sure they were not "sighting" but locating aids for the table fitter
                        Up the TSF!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Interesting. So there is a purpose after all. If professional pool players swear by them, they must be useful.
                          I guess their use just doesn't translate into game of snooker, the dynamics of which are quite different. I still
                          think they look out of place on a snooker table though :P

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So looking properly tonight, the spots on the rails are:-

                            Top and bottom rail - dead centre spot line
                            Top table side rails - baulk line
                            Below centre from baulk side rails(weird one) about 2 inches below pink spot??? All made sense till this one.

                            Can't sleep now..... Lol!
                            sigpicNo cheap shots...well maybe the odd one if its funny...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Canadian Snooker Table: CanadaBilliards or Olhausen?

                              I think the one down near the pink is in case you want to change the baulk end.
                              Up the TSF!

                              Comment

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