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Best routines for break building / positional play / learning angles

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  • Best routines for break building / positional play / learning angles

    Apologies if I've missed this, have had a look through the archives..

    What are you favourite routines for break building, positional play and learning angles? (Other than the line-up)

  • #2
    I’m not a believer in the line up ,great if your a pro and want to get serious practice in before matches ,I find the line up boring .I prefer to spend twenty mins or so knocking in long balls then spreading all 15 reds out with colours on their spots and seeing if I can make big breaks ,this covers all angles ,cushion shots etc and gives You less options ,it’s more likeable to a real frame ,it’s also more interesting and keeps you practicing longer ,you will soon find out your weaknesses .Others may have different opinions ,but that’s just how I like to practice .
    Last edited by mikee; 12 July 2021, 05:19 PM.

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    • #3
      I do the same as Mikee, but also like to make a small cluster of 5/6 reds under the pink to create that real frame scenario where you need to split the reds at some point. So really helps break building as if you only ever go into the pack off the black in real frames you are missing out on learning how the pack opens best using different angles and stun screw side etc on the shots.
      No cheap shots...well maybe the odd one if its funny...

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      • #4
        Originally Posted by Cue crafty View Post
        I do the same as Mikee, but also like to make a small cluster of 5/6 reds under the pink to create that real frame scenario where you need to split the reds at some point. So really helps break building as if you only ever go into the pack off the black in real frames you are missing out on learning how the pack opens best using different angles and stun screw side etc on the shots.
        Spot on Mr Crafty ,I too do that with a small cluster ,also if your having trouble getting past 70 or 80 in practice breaks ,it’s good just to practice clearing the table with 4 or 5 reds and the colours ,as this is where position becomes more critical and where you are more likely to breakdown before the ton mark .Practicing the long Potts before a session I find useful as you generally miss the shots more to one side than the other ,so it’s good feed back on your cueing .

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        • #5
          I also prefer scattering the reds around with a small cluster below the pink and maybe one or two on a cushion. I can do solo practice like that for hours and never count the break as that distracts me but have got to 13 reds and colours a few times. At the end of the practice session I'll spend some time with just a few reds with one in the baulk area so I have to play the cueball up the table to get the final red and clear the colours. That's good practice for pinching frames and I then spend time with just the six colours trying to clear them a few times. I read somewhere that you should always finish a practice session with something positive so if you're not playing well and not enjoying it then try another routine and end on something that feels like an accomplishment such as clearing the six colours.

          For a good read you can't go wrong with Stephen Hendry's Masterclass (1994) which has in-depth chapters covering the angles and break building and some very interesting points about mental approach. I don't think I have my copy anymore.
          Last edited by MrRottweiler; 12 July 2021, 09:37 PM.
          www.mixcloud.com/jfd

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          • #6
            I might try and find that book ,I’m just finishing Hendry’s autobiography ,me and the table ,it’s amazing the demons that did him in after the 90’s ,lack of confidence and dwelling on missed shots ,thinking he can’t win etc ,all the things that us average joes deal with in the game .

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            • #7
              I set up a frame with just 6 reds. Position the pack about 4” down from the pink, slowly split the reds from the side cushion, then place the cue ball wherever you want to start and try to clear up! I’ve been trying this exercise on and off for 6 months and still haven’t managed to complete it! Closest I’ve been was down to a thin cut final black for the clearance and I missed it . What I have noticed though is I have got more consistent with it.

              Another nice simple routine, black on its spot, one red halfway between the black and the cushion and another halfway between the black and pink spot. Just play red black, red black and keep re-spotting the balls and see how many you can clear.

              Next I try the colour clearance 3 times in a row.

              Finally my favourite routine, set the colours up, place a 6 red triangle behind the pink and spread the rest of the reds randomly around the black, pink and blue area. Try to make a break. Similar to the lads above, only I have a slightly adaption! Every time you miss a ball, you then have to place two reds randomly back on to the table. This will keep the routine going longer and teach you to concentrate more on getting a good cue ball so as to not miss as often.

              After this I would say have 1 day a week where you have a set of 4 or 5 routines and record the results. This way you can look back in a few months and check progress

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              • #8
                Thank you all. Some solid tips there - I will be giving the routines a try and looking to get the Stephen Hendry Masterclass.

                My biggest problem seems to be concentration and what a lot of us have discussed on another post, getting into that 'zone'. I can make regular 30's and had the odd 56, but then can't muster a 16 and will miss simple easy shots.

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                • #9
                  If you haven’t got a full blown headache after about an hour of solid practice then your not concentrating hard enough! Lol

                  Also, check your straight cueing, I find I start missing silly shot due to my cueing going off straight, usually for me it due to flicking unwanted left-hand side.

                  Try the white up and down the spots, but place a red on the blue spot, hit the red up and down the the table and if your cueing straight it should bounce back and cannon the cue ball!
                  Last edited by Danger Steve; 13 July 2021, 10:04 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Test Post.......
                    Up the TSF!

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                    • #11
                      test post....
                      Up the TSF!

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                      • #12
                        Thanks MrRottweiler and Mikee, have ordered both books and looking forward to reading them.

                        Inner game of tennis was another recommended by someone on the forums. That arrived last week and has been a very good book so far,

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                        • #13
                          Originally Posted by Danger Steve View Post
                          If you haven’t got a full blown headache after about an hour of solid practice then your not concentrating hard enough! Lol

                          Also, check your straight cueing, I find I start missing silly shot due to my cueing going off straight, usually for me it due to flicking unwanted left-hand side.

                          Try the white up and down the spots, but place a red on the blue spot, hit the red up and down the the table and if your cueing straight it should bounce back and cannon the cue ball!
                          Lol. I find that hard enough doing it with the pink, I'd be chuffed to bits hitting it from the blue spot.

                          Straight cueing is probably the thing I practice most and always start with at least half an hour just potting long blue and then 3/4 length reds to stop for the pink, certainly my nemesis.
                          Snooker Crazy - Cues and Equipment Sales Website
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                          • #14
                            A few from me;
                            1) Blacks off the spot, keep potting the black and play for position on the next black. My record is 107 before boredom took over and the exhibition shots came out.
                            2) Line up - I disagree with a few posts, it's not just for pros, i know it's tedious BUT the line up is a massive tool for muscle memory. In a match scenario you will very rarely be in perfect position and the line up is very good for helping you to memorise thick/thin reds for position onto the next colour.
                            3) Colours off their spots - simple but not many can actually do it! Best thing about this is each shot is different i.e. to clear the colours you'll likely need to play soft stuns, screws etc.
                            4) Blue on it's spot and reds set out in a line level with the pink spot - keep potting reds and try to play on the blue. this is a great drill to help you get topside of the blue each time.

                            Hopefully some of these are helpful, good luck!
                            "just tap it in"

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                            • #15
                              Colours off the spots is a great practice ,try colours off the spots with out using any cushions ,not as easy as it seems ,you really do have work for the perfect angles on every ball to manage it .

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