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Best way to improve my break building

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  • Best way to improve my break building

    Hi all,

    What is the best way to improve my break building game? I am a decent player and can most balls well but I will miss the occasional easy one or run out of position easily. I have tried the reds between the black and pink and can clear those most times.

    Is there a training system that I can use so I know that I am improving, for instance complete set up A 10 times then setup B etc...?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Just put the hours in on the table.

    Just work with 6 reds. Put them around the table and clear them...

    When you can do that, try clearing them with all blacks, then all pinks, all blues, baulk colours only etc. Then add more balls when your level improves and continue to scale up.

    The best advice I can give to anyone wanting to make big breaks is to stop trying to make big breaks. Just stay at the table. Breaks are a by-product of staying at the table. Don't try risky positional shots for an extra point or two if you can get better position from a baulk or blue.

    Stay at the table, the points soon add up.

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    • #3
      Thanks and what about practising position, should I just do the same thing?

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      • #4
        You can't really practice positional play in isolation.

        But learning to make those minimal clearances all over the table over and over again... Over time your positional competence will get better and better.

        A little tip I tend to teach people is that the angle of the pot isn't as important as being able to get your hand on the table comfortably.
        For example, I'd much rather have my hand on the table for a 1/4 black from low/high that have a half ball black with the white 2/3 inches from the cushion.

        Players beginning to develop break building skills neglect the importance of being able to get their hand on the table in favour of having a more favourable angle.

        It's all just experience through practice I suppose but hopefully that's a little tip that could save some headaches

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        • #5
          Originally posted by nerozero View Post
          Hi all,

          What is the best way to improve my break building game? I am a decent player and can most balls well but I will miss the occasional easy one or run out of position easily. I have tried the reds between the black and pink and can clear those most times.

          Is there a training system that I can use so I know that I am improving, for instance complete set up A 10 times then setup B etc...?

          Thanks
          1- Learn potting balls and positional play of CB ( as already mentioned , requires lots of practice ).

          2_ Think 2 shots ahead. (easier said than done ).
          John Higgins is one of the best when it comes to this part. He has the best brains for the game,imo.

          3-Shot selection.
          You choose the wrong shot, you may end up asking yourself: how the hell did i end up here?
          as a result , you gonna heve to play a diff recovery shot to get back to position or end of break.

          S Hendry said: when he was young, he watched hours and hours to S Davis's videos ( matches ), in order to learn the shot selection. (excellent idea, imo)
          The problem of many players is ( and i'm one of them ), they watch how a pro potting balls rather than pay more attention to his shot selection..
          whether he potts the balls or not , it's not important . Pay attention to his shot selection.

          This are few points I heard once from someone . may be useful to your game.

          Goodluck with 147s .

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          • #6
            If there is one piece of advice on break building that I could give it would be to play on a choice of reds instead of playing for one specific red.Give yourself options.
            Also concentrate on where you need to leave the cue ball to A) leave a simple colour B) leave yourself on the colour in such a way that position on the next red is achievable.
            "just tap it in"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ramon View Post

              3-Shot selection.
              You choose the wrong shot, you may end up asking yourself: how the hell did i end up here?
              as a result , you gonna have to play a diff recovery shot to get back to position or end of break.

              S Hendry said: when he was young, he watched hours and hours to S Davis's videos ( matches ), in order to learn the shot selection. (excellent idea, imo)
              The problem of many players is ( and i'm one of them ), they watch how a pro potting balls rather than pay more attention to his shot selection..
              whether he pots the balls or not , it's not important . Pay attention to his shot selection.

              This are few points I heard once from someone . may be useful to your game.

              Goodluck with 147s .
              excellent point. positional play is very important and shot selection makes the task easier if chosen correctly.

              Originally posted by pottr View Post
              the angle of the shot isn't as important as being able to get your hand on the table comfortably
              this is very true i have tested this myself numerous times, ive set up half ball blacks with my hand on the table and the same angle further back 2-3 inches off the cushion and i'll miss a lot more where it's close to the cushion

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              • #8
                One thing I'll add, identify which positional shots you tend to struggle with. We've all had those positions during our development where cue ball control felt a bit like hit and hope. Take mental or physcial note of those, watch a bunch of pro snooker to see how the top players approach those same shots (not counting the flare shots at the end of course). Often the correct choice is not actually hard to execute, it's just being able to identify it.

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                • #9
                  Hendry used to start with 3or 4 reds on just scattered around the table..then once they are all cleared move onto 5 or 6 reds until eventually your clearing all the reds with colours..line ups are great for cue ball control but scattering the balls around the table makes you think more about areas of position rather than between blue and black

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