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  • BCE westbury table

    Anyone ever played on or owned one of these table? How is the general feel and is it tournament grade? I know the slate is less than 2 inches but what about pocket size and other aspects?

  • #2
    only once, some years back. To me all these tables are very similar that you probably wouldn't really notice the difference playing wise from a Riley, Star or BCE. Obviously the pocket size will depend on whether you have them templated to professional standard. Can't say about the slate, to most players the table is irrelevant, so long as its true and the cloth and cushions are good that is all that matter. Like cues though, not every table plays the same, all depends on the condition its in.

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    • #3
      At my old club the Westbury steel block is my favourite table by far. Pockets are tightish but with the curved rubbers (cut into the pocket, hard to explain!) like the modern star tables, really nice.

      If and when i get the room for a table, i will certainly get a BCE Westbury.
      Unclevit C Brand - CueGuru Tip.

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      • #4
        If you think that these tables were used in the pro game all through the 80's and early 90's, then yes it is a tournament grade table. I still think they look better than anything used since, and the old ones aren't expensive. I especially like the wide pocket plate profiles, which was actually one of the main reasons i got that table, as well as growing up watching all the great players play on them.

        Conditions are not just about the table though, as we often see tables behaving differently at different events on the televised pro tournaments.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bricktip View Post
          If you think that these tables were used in the pro game all through the 80's and early 90's, then yes it is a tournament grade table. I still think they look better than anything used since, and the old ones aren't expensive. I especially like the wide pocket plate profiles, which was actually one of the main reasons i got that table, as well as growing up watching all the great players play on them.

          Conditions are not just about the table though, as we often see tables behaving differently at different events on the televised pro tournaments.
          Thanks guys! what is wide pocket plate(does it mean pocket is wider)? I personally prefer tight pocket as that is the only way to prepare you for tournament play, that's just me.

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          • #6
            It has nothing to do with the pocket size. The pocket size can be as tight as you want, as it depends on the template the rubbers have been cut to. When i talk about the wide pocket plate i mean the bit that you would put your hand if you were playing a shot where the white is in the jaws of the corner pocket. The plate is as wide as the wood on the cushion where the two meet. Does that make any sense?

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            • #7
              oh I see, my bad!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cue_Seeker View Post
                Anyone ever played on or owned one of these table? How is the general feel and is it tournament grade? I know the slate is less than 2 inches but what about pocket size and other aspects?
                Good quality tables with 1"3/4 slate and xx broadbow pocket plates. We (Enbild) actually done some manufacturing of cushions for them in the 80's when they were struggling to meet demand.
                Billiard Fitters always have time for a nap!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cue_Seeker View Post
                  Thanks guys! what is wide pocket plate(does it mean pocket is wider)? I personally prefer tight pocket as that is the only way to prepare you for tournament play, that's just me.
                  I have been told by a senior coach that having normal sized pockets is actually what you should have for practice. If it's too tight, then you can get frustrated when you aren't cueing well. Your practice system should be about training your arm and your mind and all other factors should controlled and out of the way (your shoes, your cue tip, your cue, etc). That includes a table with out of sort pockets.
                  Mayur Jobanputra, Snooker Coach and Snooker Enthusiast
                  My Snooker Blog: www.snookerdelight.com

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                  • #10
                    I played on a BCE Westbury steel block for years when I first learned the game and I absolutely loved it. It was a fantastic table to play on with lively cushions and a very solid table. Now I play on a Riley and it's just not the same. If you can get one, go for it.
                    Mayur Jobanputra, Snooker Coach and Snooker Enthusiast
                    My Snooker Blog: www.snookerdelight.com

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