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Slow cushions - suggestions?

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  • Slow cushions - suggestions?

    Sorry to bore you all with another cushion question ...

    Two years ago I "treated" my table to a new set of steel block cushions, driven by the hope to improve playing conditions.
    Wasn't really convinced by the speed of the bounce, but kept a positive attitude. The next summer, I had an experienced English table fitter over take a look at the rubbers and have his general opinion - which was that there was nothing wrong, the rubbers being Northern and that's about it.

    I know that the current environmental conditions the room provides are not really good, as I can't keep up permanent heating, but are there any means to get the cushions "up to speed"?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated - thanks

  • #2
    Interesting question. I don't have the answers, but you mention heating. Does that mean the bounce is better when the room is heated sufficiently? I've played on steel cushion tables in rooms that you would think would be slow (a bit cold and humid), yet they bounce like a Star with under slate heaters – and on the other hand, the same type of table in a different room has a terribly sluggish bounce.

    Regarding heating. It might be worth trying to gently heat a part of the cushion to see if it helps, obviously with something that can't cause damage.

    Also, what balls do you use? I presume the heavier TC balls which should provide better run and bounce.
    Last edited by bricktip; 19th January 2017, 12:11 PM.

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    • #3
      Concerning the environment - I can at least say the table plays not really different in summer - and also back then when I had additional table heating the bounce wasn't really affected.
      So I guess it's not so much of a deal.

      All balls in use are ATC

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      • #4
        Depends what height the block is set at . older tables had higher blocks for the rubber to sit on as rubber profile was larger than modern Northern Rubber , the nose of the older rubber was a bit deeper to the bottom edge hitting the ball just above centre , some of this rubber profile had beveled front edge others where laminated rubber much deeper profiled .

        if the old blocks are left on then the latest profile of L shape rubber would have the bottom edge that makes contact with the ball slightly higher , thus trapping the ball slightly on impact on not rebounding 100% .

        some older fitters also make the blocks too high , I know one who is still doing this and some of his tables have extremely high blocks , resulting in high rubber in relation to contact of ball

        have you ever played on a table where the ball bounces upwards as it hits the cushion , the opposite of your scenario is the ball fly's around the table , but jumps off the rubber as the ball is making contact with the nose of the rubber just below center .

        also slightly loading the rubber when sticking on the block , a slight stretch not too much loads the rubber for better rebound .

        From the information you are supplying have a look at the cushion rubber nose height in relation to centre of ball contact ., the cushion bolts are tight , the blocks are not loose or split with nails inserted from a bad recover , the cloth is not thick or too tight restricting the bounce , or the rubber has been kept in too cold conditions it has now permanently damaged the rebound value and is hardening through chemical change due to low temperature .

        there is a lot of things that could be wrong maybe just one thing or maybe a combination of two or three of the above .

        thin cloth is for faster table , and rubber set at the correct height is a must have , the lower edge should make contact just above dead centre of ball higher you lose bounce , lower and you gain bounce but the ball jumps on impact with cushion .

        here is a table that had new blocks fitted that where too high and also covered the old fashioned way with lint under cloth resulting in a very bad bounce to cushion http://gclbilliards.com/re-rubber-re...-metric-table/

        if your steel cushions are new modern ones they should have the correct blocks fitted but check how the nose of the rubber aligns with centre of ball on contact if too high

        then blocks on steel cushions can be unscrewed off and even with rubber still hatched the underside could be planed down a bit resulting in lowering the cushion , a fiddly time consuming job though

        the only remedy to this table in the photo's is to take the rubber off and the blocks , replace the blocks ( A Big Job ) with thinner depth ones and try and refit the rubber is possible if not another new re-rubber .

        here is a cross section from Norman Clares History link to how rubber has evolved over the years , some of the old cushion blocks can still be found on older cushions and rubber has been fastens to it when in all probability they should have been re-blocked as well as being re-rubbered . http://www.snookerheritage.co.uk/nor...able-cushions/
        Last edited by Geoff Large; 19th January 2017, 03:00 PM.
        [/SIGPIC]http://www.gclbilliards.com

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        • #5
          Hello Geoff,

          As always, your input is highly appreciated
          The cushion height was my first guess, too - but I hoped that getting a brand new set of Peradons would set me up with up to spec equipment. Rubbers and support fillets being usually standard parts?!
          Being new, they also never have been re-clothed.

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          • #6
            The only other suggestion is heat underfloor matting with insulation silver foil to stop over heating the rubber set to a thermostat , to warm the cushion rubber up before play

            some people put this under the slate too , the key is thermostat controlled to avoid any burning of cloth or polish on cushion cappings .

            if your cushions are Peradon then they will be made correct height .
            [/SIGPIC]http://www.gclbilliards.com

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            • #7
              I found, installing a dehumidifier, has had a big impact on improving the play of the table. For both winter & summer months.
              Highest break to date? 1

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              • #8
                Thanks to anyone who posted so far.

                One other thing I'd like to mention is that clean balls really "bite" the cushions excessively. So maybe it's really a height issue?
                I think I will shave off a mm on the next recloth ...

                Dehumidifying (and of course heating) would improve the situation for sure - it's just the matter of running cost vs. commitment that's the issue.

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                • #9
                  Any idea what height from the bed would the top of the rubber be, it northern rubber on old steel blocks on b/watt table.

                  these steels i have put on the table have no cloth on them but i have the bed cloth on, on throwing the ball up and down it goes about 6 times would you say the rubbers are ok, they do not have any cracks on them.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chas6868 View Post
                    Any idea what height from the bed would the top of the rubber be, it northern rubber on old steel blocks on b/watt table.
                    from template images the top of the cushion (cloth) is 39mm above the bed cloth.


                    Originally posted by chas6868 View Post
                    these steels i have put on the table have no cloth on them but i have the bed cloth on, on throwing the ball up and down it goes about 6 times would you say the rubbers are ok, they do not have any cracks on them.
                    Are you saying you are getting 6 times length of the table or are you asking if 6 times the length of the table the target for well set cushions?
                    Hopefully table fitters and those with their own tables will comment on what they get
                    Up the TSF!

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                    • #11
                      39mm mines are about 43mm before they have any cloth on them

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                      • #12
                        Yes I am also asking about the bounce of the rubbers that have NO cloth on them yet as them seem to be very fast but I take it once the cloth is on it may slow right down!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chas6868 View Post
                          39mm mines are about 43mm before they have any cloth on them
                          it seems the important measurement is not the top but the height where the ball contacts the cushion, on one image it seems to be 30mm but slightly different on an other. (full size table with full size balls)

                          where are those table fitters when you need them
                          Up the TSF!

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