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  • "Chinese snookered"????

    During the UK final coverage, the commentators mentioned the term "Chinese snookered", when you get the cueball tight on a colour and together with an object red the three balls are in a line.

    Why the phrase "Chinese snookered" here? Any response is welcome. Thank you.



    EDIT: does anyone know where I can download those little documentaries BBC showed in the mid session interval? With a look back on this tourament and one about Ronnie. Thanks a million!

  • #2
    Chineese snooker is when you CAN see the object balls but cueing is awkward- the reason being Chinese is backwards, and this is a backwards snooker.
    1994 a good year
    The Masters a great event
    The Final a marvellous match
    The Winner a snooker genius
    Alan McManus The Winner
    Stephen Hendry The Loser

    1994 a good year....

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    • #3
      Imagine rolling up to a colour ball very very very tightly snookering your opponent............now turn it it around.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mcmanusrules
        Chineese snooker is when you CAN see the object balls but cueing is awkward- the reason being Chinese is backwards, and this is a backwards snooker.


        What the feck is that supposed to mean I beg your pardon?

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        • #5
          I think well is after why it is called 'Chinese snooker'. I don't have the answer, I'm afraid.
          2006 Premier League Prediction Contest Winner

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          • #6
            I don't think anyone knows why its called that. The answer is lost in the old history of the game if I'm not mistaken.

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            • #7
              I meant what WT said in commentry, he may be wrong in that writing right to left, and reading that way too.
              Am I right or wrong?
              1994 a good year
              The Masters a great event
              The Final a marvellous match
              The Winner a snooker genius
              Alan McManus The Winner
              Stephen Hendry The Loser

              1994 a good year....

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cap
                I think well is after why it is called 'Chinese snooker'. I don't have the answer, I'm afraid.
                Thanks for reinforcing my point cap, despite it being already quite clear.

                Yes I am puzzled by the origin of this saying, who first invented that and why....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by well
                  Originally posted by mcmanusrules
                  Chineese snooker is when you CAN see the object balls but cueing is awkward- the reason being Chinese is backwards, and this is a backwards snooker.
                  What the feck is that supposed to mean I beg your pardon?
                  I'm sure no offence was intended, but this does seem the likely origin of the term. Chinese writing is 'backwards' relative to English (and unlike other right-to-left scripts is, for some reason, quite famously so).

                  As for who coined the term, that is surely lost in the annals of history. I would say that I've heard the word 'Chinese' used to mean backwards in other contexts, disagreeable as it might sound to a modern ear, so it wouldn't be at all surprising to me if there was no more complex a reason than this. I certainly doubt the shot is literally in any way Chinese (in the same way as the Chinaman bowl in cricket), as its use long predates any Chinese snooker players that I know of.

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                  • #10
                    Clive Everton once gave an explanation in his commentary. He said they do things in reverse in China, for instance, wearing black for occasions of happiness and white in mourning. So in the case of a snooker, instead of snookering behind a ball you snooker in front of it.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Robert602
                      I'm sure no offence was intended, but this does seem the likely origin of the term. Chinese writing is 'backwards' relative to English (and unlike other right-to-left scripts is, for some reason, quite famously so).

                      As for who coined the term, that is surely lost in the annals of history. I would say that I've heard the word 'Chinese' used to mean backwards in other contexts, disagreeable as it might sound to a modern ear, so it wouldn't be at all surprising to me if there was no more complex a reason than this. I certainly doubt the shot is literally in any way Chinese (in the same way as the Chinaman bowl in cricket), as its use long predates any Chinese snooker players that I know of.
                      Most insightful, thanks very much. And cheers to anyone who contributed in this thread.

                      Should be a very old saying anyways, because I think people have been writing from left to right in China for more than half a century now. And before that, they wrote from top to bottom to be exact.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cyril
                        Clive Everton once gave an explanation in his commentary. He said they do things in reverse in China, for instance, wearing black for occasions of happiness and white in mourning. So in the case of a snooker, instead of snookering behind a ball you snooker in front of it.

                        Not exactly, black and white both are for mourning, red is the most often seen colour for oaccasions of happiness as in a wedding.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by well
                          Most insightful, thanks very much. And cheers to anyone who contributed in this thread.

                          Should be a very old saying anyways, because I think people have been writing from left to right in China for more than half a century now. And before that, they wrote from top to bottom to be exact.
                          top to bottom for each character, but each line is right to left
                          ---

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