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Backswing Problem (Forgotten my Stroke)

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  • Backswing Problem (Forgotten my Stroke)

    Hey people. Greetings to all. Hope you are well. I finally have free time and I'm back to playing snooker after a long time. I seem to be having an issue with my delivery. On short and medium power shots my spins seem to be ok but on high power shots (long backswings) my elbow drops slightly during the backswing and does NOT return to its original position at the point of contact. Just need tips on how I can make sure my elbow returns to that position.. I feel like I'm learning the game once again lol

  • #2
    Just concentrate on keeping the elbow up as high as possible. On a longer backswing the elbow has to drop a bit in order to keep the cue on the same plane but it should return to its highest position within the first 2" of forward travel.

    Practice this by cueing along the baulkline and if you can use a mirror you can watch what you're doing. Do it as slow as possible and you will 'train your brain'.

    Terry
    Terry Davidson
    IBSF Master Coach & Examiner

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    • #3
      I cue up to the object ball vertical - it is your pref on if you prefer a vertical address position or slightly before or after then because I grip with my second finger and thumb I put a bit of clear tape on this point on the butt to remind me to hold the cue in the same place on certain shots.

      For me remembering the back swing and timing is very important to keep your consistency on each shot - it helps me in this regard to just remember the feeling of the opening and closing of the grip on the back-swing - each might be different in this regard - some players have a wrist action and flick the wrist with the timing of the shot some grip - I don't have a wrist action myself and prefer to keep it locked so the important thing for me is to get feedback on the grip for my timing as I sort of slightly close and squeeze gently - like holding a small bird and closing without strangling the poor thing - letting the cue do the work and go forward through to the follow position and completion of the shot - thus my memory of this is more sensory than technical - I do work on stuff in practice but I think it debilitating to my game to think am I doing this or that when on the shot in a game - so I pick these methods as the feedback I get from these things eliminates that process leaving me to play the game without too much thought.

      Whatever cueing method you adopt I feel it important to stay consistent - good luck
      Last edited by Byrom; 1st December 2014, 01:09 PM.

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      • #4
        Happy New Year to all. And thanks a lot I have started getting back in form slowly. Only issue now is the delivery. I have heard that the best way is to play with the same cueing force, but just change backswing lengths to vary the cue power. Personally I have been using different lengths with different acceleration without noticing..
        I wanna try the cueing method of constant force. Any input on how to keep the force the same

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CJ Kumz View Post
          Happy New Year to all. And thanks a lot I have started getting back in form slowly. Only issue now is the delivery. I have heard that the best way is to play with the same cueing force, but just change backswing lengths to vary the cue power. Personally I have been using different lengths with different acceleration without noticing..
          I wanna try the cueing method of constant force. Any input on how to keep the force the same
          Its all consistent rhythm and timing - key to it for me is the grip and the pause as these are the things that helps me settle into this rhythm - its a sensory thing that is habitual - I cant explain what it is really or how to do it maybe I think all players have got their own way - but you notice they all do it there own way the same way all the time - good question - Terry or another coach another might be able to better explain this point - I don't properly know the answer myself.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CJ Kumz View Post
            Happy New Year to all. And thanks a lot I have started getting back in form slowly. Only issue now is the delivery. I have heard that the best way is to play with the same cueing force, but just change backswing lengths to vary the cue power. Personally I have been using different lengths with different acceleration without noticing..
            I wanna try the cueing method of constant force. Any input on how to keep the force the same
            What you're talking about is the method coached by Terry Griffiths who advocates 3 different lengths of backswing depending on the power required so that the acceleration is somewhat constant on every shot. The other option is what Nic Barrow teaches and is used by most of the pros, which is a longer backswing for all shots and controlling the rate of acceleration for each shot.

            No matter what method you choose it still becomes a matter of personal preference, however for higher power shots the backswing should be longer as this will give the power required without the player unconsciously getting his shoulder muscle into the shot.

            There is just one thing I'd like to add...no matter what you hear or read every player will adjust both backswing length AND his rate of acceleration just because it's impossible not to unless you are a robot or have a Data-like mechanical brain. In order to reduce the effects of rapid acceleration the longer backswing will make everything smoother and more consistent but on a power shot every player will still accelerate the cue at a higher rate no matter what the backswing length is.

            Bottom line...please go with what you feel is more natural and comfortable for you and don't try to change things too drastically as then you take yourself through another new learning curve.
            Terry Davidson
            IBSF Master Coach & Examiner

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