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  • Buying a new cue

    The title is perhaps misleading as I'm not necessarily looking to buy a cue. I'm happy with my game in that I know the strengths and weaknesses and what I need to work on. But I read a lot about folk buying a new cue, so my question is - is it simply folk spending money because they can, other than of course someone who has a damaged cue or one they know isn't straight and therefore they have a genuine need for a new cue.

    I'm not one for blaming the tools - its down to the workman and all that.

    I have a vague recollection, and this may simply be an urban myth, that I read that Stephen Hendry won more than one world championships with a £20 cue from Argos?

    So how do I know if I need a new cue and indeed would it make any difference to my game?

  • #2
    (A) if you open your case and its empty you need a new cue and (b) no

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    • #3
      so if it doesn't make a difference then why are so many folk always buying new cues? A bit like buying a new car - changing for the same of changing generally speaking?

      Smee

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      • #4
        i guess buying a new may rekindle your interest and give you a new, more positive outlook... so it may have an effect on your play. Possibly!

        I can remember years ago I spent £240 on a 2nd hand JP Superior - a lot of coin back then - and that made me focus on practicing to improve to justify spending equiv of a weeks wage back then on it.

        So a new cue did, in a round about way, improve my game(tenuous reason I know)
        #jeSuisMasterBlasterBarryWhite2v1977Luclex(andHisF ictiousTwin)BigSplash!

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        • #5
          New cue syndrome it works sometimes lol

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Smeeagain View Post
            so if it doesn't make a difference then why are so many folk always buying new cues? A bit like buying a new car - changing for the same of changing generally speaking?

            Smee
            Youve got 2 sorts of people, you have the player who will buy a cue and that cue will last them years and wether they can afford to buy another cue or not they'll generally keep with the same cue.
            Then you have got the collector type player whos on every waiting list from UK to Bangkok who just enjoy cues in general.

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            • #7
              Thanks. Part of my reason for asking is that although I've said I'm not necessarily looking to buy a new cue, I've had my current cue for years and I got it before I knew there was an optimum length , weight etc for each individual player. I just picked it up, tried it and said this'll do. But I'm wondering if getting, for example, a cue of the correct length (I haven't checked mine yet to see if it is/isn't the right length) would make a difference?

              Smee

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              • #8
                If your own cue feels right to you.
                Then that's the cue for you!
                www.sbandsa.co.uk

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                • #9
                  Being a golfer I can relate to this for sure! In golf the clubs are marketed in a such a way that you'd think they all do very different stuff, and the latest such and such club is the answer to all your problems. Its all snake-oil stuff of course! Yes, some golf clubs are better suited to good players, and some better for beginners - but essentially golfers change clubs a LOT because they either are just attracted to shiny stuff, or they're looking for something that will change their game. Its really no different in snooker - or probably any sport that requires a club/bat/stick/racket or whatever.
                  I know a lot of guys on here just like cues - and understandably so. Snooker cues are possibly the last remaining bastion of traditional skilled craftsmanship in sport. I can't help but admire any handmade snooker cue. The fact that someone has created that cue with their own hands, and spent many hours of love and care on making it the best they can. Who wouldn't be impressed by that! And when you get a new cue you get a real buzz of excitement. It can re-kindle your love for the game and you can't wait to go and play with it.
                  So I guess there are two types of people who change their cues. There are those who maybe think they're not improving their top break of 30-40 because the cue is to stiff/too heavy/wrong wood/whatever (and of course these poor chaps are misguided). And then there are those who just love cues - and probably own a few. I believe Dominic Dale is like this - he loves a cue, that guy!
                  I must admit, rather like a woman - sticking with one cue forever kind of seems like you're missing out on lots of other lovely cues that are out there. But - again, like a woman - when you've found a good one, why switch!?

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                  • #10
                    your comment about other sports is interesting. I'm an ex rower and I can tell you that novices learn the sport far easier with heavy wooden oars and then graduate to ultralight carbon fibre oars. Beginners cant control the light oars at all

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                    • #11
                      So why does someone like John Higgins (see post in the snooker lounge) try out so many cues before he is happy - seems like he feels that the cue does make a difference??

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Smeeagain View Post
                        your comment about other sports is interesting. I'm an ex rower and I can tell you that novices learn the sport far easier with heavy wooden oars and then graduate to ultralight carbon fibre oars. Beginners cant control the light oars at all
                        Yeah its definitely interesting to see that in many other sports that require equipment, there are different types of kit suited to people of different standards. Golf is certainly one - and rowing too by the sounds of it. There are probably quite a few other examples, but I guess this doesn't apply in snooker where there are cues suited to beginners and others for professionals and very good players. But I think people change their cue/clubs/racket/whatever for reasons other than just skill progression. In golf it is either the hope of the latest fad making a difference, or equipment being worn out maybe - but often it is just the enjoyment of having something new.

                        John Higgins is an interesting one - and a really good example. My guess would be that he once had a cue which was perfect for him, and for whatever reason he's got rid of it. And is now searching for a new cue that plays just like he remembers the old one playing. Every cue plays different to those guys - even if it is the exact same specs etc. I reckon he's probably now searching for something that doesn't exist!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Smeeagain View Post
                          So why does someone like John Higgins (see post in the snooker lounge) try out so many cues before he is happy - seems like he feels that the cue does make a difference??
                          I wouldn't buy into that to much, many snooker players will have a drop in confidence and have an off day and think it's automatically down to the cue which is very rarely the case. You only have to look at players who've struggled of late with constant cue changes Maguire, Dale and possibly more players. Obviously

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                          • #14
                            Ok so let's say I'm thinking of buying a new cue - well actually my Mrs is as she asked me what I wanted for my 50th birthday I've heard good things about Mastercue (don't have the John Parris budget!), but am reticent to order a cue online made to spec from Thailand in case there is a problem - anyone had any issues?

                            Secondly I have an old £20 cue that I've always played with - plays fine for me but I have no idea about what the 'correct' length (and weight) should be? I borrowed a mates cue recently as my tip came off mid game and noticed his cue felt much heavier (don't know by how much) and I really liked that. So how I do order the correct length and weight ? Do i need to go to a shop somewhere and try out different cue lengths and weights?

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                            • #15
                              My first advice would be to definitely try some out if you can. Different people like different weight cues, with different sized butts and different balance point. 2-piece, 3 quarter and 1-piece all feel different and have different natural balance too.
                              In terms of sizing - for most average sized people, a standard sized cue is actually fine normally. But its definitely worth checking this. The generally-accepted method for measuring what length cue you need is to set up as if you're playing a shot. You want to have and inch or two of the butt poking out the back of your back hand (right hand of you're RH) then get someone to check your right forearm is hanging down exactly vertically, then you should have 12" of cue between your bridge and the tip. The variation will come from how long your arms are, and how straight/bent your left arm is on a standard shot.

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