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Is it Possible??

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  • Is it Possible??

    A friend of mine during our yesterday practice told me that during his early snooker days, he used to deliver his cue straight during his practice session (Brown to Black dot straight cue practice and Baulk line straight cue delivery practice routines).
    He told me that he was becoming more confident as he was able to deliver straight cue 8 out of 10 times and little side in the other 2.
    However, when he actually play the game, his cue delivery accuracy keep on decreasing throughout the match.

    The reason he told me is that during his practice he used to put the cue ball on the brown spot and hit it. This gives enough space to put your bridge firmly and make your stance that is perpendicular to the table cushion (ideal conditions in his words). Even during the baulk line practice same situation comes as there is ample space to put your bridge firmly and make a stance that is perpendicular to the cushion.

    But during the match, most of the shots he would face are either in a ways that he cannot make a perpendicular stance with the table or he is not able to put his bridge firmly (cue ball near the cushion or sticking to it).

    He told me as during the matches, these are the types of shots one would face, the practice of the straight cue delivery was not helping much in this case and after playing snooker for 5 years now, he is still facing this trouble every now and then.

    That got me thinking, is it really possible for someone to make a perfect stance and cue delivery during practice and bad during the match?
    If yes, then how can you overcome such problems?
    I Admire Ding, Adore Judd & Would do ANYTHING to play like Ronnie.

  • #2
    There should be no reason why he can't deliver straight in an actual frame if he can deliver straight but there is a difference in that with a frame he has 2 balls to worry about rather than just the one when shooting the spots.

    The only thing that really differs in a match is the bridge and I believe he needs to practice more using different bridges.

    In addition he is now splitting his concentration between potting and cueball control. He should be practicing the line-up and long blues to give himself the practice and experience when trying to control both balls.
    Terry Davidson
    IBSF Master Coach & Examiner

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    • #3
      Does he wear glasses or have eyesight problems? Like Terry said the difference is that with a frame he has 2 balls to worry about which would change his focus at some point. When I was younger I used to do Ten Pin Bowling. I wear glasses and have done since about age 9. Anyone that has Ten Pin Bowled with any sort of seriousness would know there are Dots and Arrows on the lanes. I found that I had one eye that was more dominate than the other, so even though I could see near perfect with glasses on, having to focus from very close, close, to far away in such a short period of time, my dominate eye made my vision not 100% correct even though it was clear. A bit like if you focus on something with one eye closed and then swap between open and close eyes quickly the location of what you are focusing on changes. You said during his early snooker days, making me assume he's an older gentleman. Maybe he has eyesight issues he is not aware of.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Terry Davidson View Post
        There should be no reason why he can't deliver straight in an actual frame if he can deliver straight but there is a difference in that with a frame he has 2 balls to worry about rather than just the one when shooting the spots.

        The only thing that really differs in a match is the bridge and I believe he needs to practice more using different bridges.

        In addition he is now splitting his concentration between potting and cueball control. He should be practicing the line-up and long blues to give himself the practice and experience when trying to control both balls.
        Thanks Terry. That's very insightful.
        I Admire Ding, Adore Judd & Would do ANYTHING to play like Ronnie.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TheRowdyOne View Post
          Does he wear glasses or have eyesight problems? Like Terry said the difference is that with a frame he has 2 balls to worry about which would change his focus at some point. When I was younger I used to do Ten Pin Bowling. I wear glasses and have done since about age 9. Anyone that has Ten Pin Bowled with any sort of seriousness would know there are Dots and Arrows on the lanes. I found that I had one eye that was more dominate than the other, so even though I could see near perfect with glasses on, having to focus from very close, close, to far away in such a short period of time, my dominate eye made my vision not 100% correct even though it was clear. A bit like if you focus on something with one eye closed and then swap between open and close eyes quickly the location of what you are focusing on changes. You said during his early snooker days, making me assume he's an older gentleman. Maybe he has eyesight issues he is not aware of.
          He is in his early 30s..maybe 33-34..I have known him for over 2 years now and never seen him with glasses. If there was some sight problem, he would have faced some issue during practice sessions as well...But I have seen him in one of his sessions and he seems flawless there. So most probably, it's what Terry suggesting. Maybe he is getting his concentration divided during the match frames in cueing and potting and thats what is affecting his game.
          Last edited by _Harry_Potter_; 12th September 2015, 02:38 PM.
          I Admire Ding, Adore Judd & Would do ANYTHING to play like Ronnie.

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          • #6
            Also pressure during the match which does effect the cueing imo !!
            The problem is that many players are confused about the practice and real match . Just cus a player is able to clear the line up , does'nt mean he is a snooker player in high level an can build the high breaks ! ( in general speaking , No offence to ur friend ).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ramon View Post
              Also pressure during the match which does effect the cueing imo !!
              The problem is that many players are confused about the practice and real match . Just cus a player is able to clear the line up , does'nt mean he is a snooker player in high level an can build the high breaks ! ( in general speaking , No offence to ur friend ).
              I agree Ramon. It also depends on frequency. If a player can clear the line up six or seven times out of ten in practise, I would expect them to be reasonably capable of translating this into decent breaks in a match. Maybe fifties or sixties. If you can only do it one in ten, that really doesn't mean much in a real game, it's more of a cueing exercise. Also, the straight line up is far too forgiving of poor positional play. In a game if you miss your position you are often left with a tough shot or no shot at all, even when you play into a zone. Then the breaks ends where in a line up it will continue. The cross formation is a bit more realistic and I prefer to scatter six reds, with a couple of them tricky and some blocking others and black and pink paths to some pockets, and then try to clear the table. I rarely manage it more than once in a practise session. Get six blacks and you can score 75. My best is 73 but I usually end up in the high sixties.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ghost121 View Post
                I agree Ramon. It also depends on frequency. If a player can clear the line up six or seven times out of ten in practise, I would expect them to be reasonably capable of translating this into decent breaks in a match. Maybe fifties or sixties. If you can only do it one in ten, that really doesn't mean much in a real game, it's more of a cueing exercise. Also, the straight line up is far too forgiving of poor positional play. In a game if you miss your position you are often left with a tough shot or no shot at all, even when you play into a zone. Then the breaks ends where in a line up it will continue. The cross formation is a bit more realistic and I prefer to scatter six reds, with a couple of them tricky and some blocking others and black and pink paths to some pockets, and then try to clear the table. I rarely manage it more than once in a practise session. Get six blacks and you can score 75. My best is 73 but I usually end up in the high sixties.
                Yep,, that's mutch better !! high sixties is still , very good an well played !!
                a coach said to me once ,, try to RK the balls just as u do in a frame against Sumone or a match . Than try to play frames against yourself !! And do it in fair way ( do'nt replace the balls if u miss and play just as safe as u play agains Sumone else and try to make a breaks ). This way u do'nt get the chance every time ur at table to make breaks and you are required to create those chanses for urself ! ( he was right , imo ).
                Not saying line up is a poor P Rtin ,, it's a very good cueing exercise and good practic for CB control , as u already mantioned !!

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