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  • Ssb - jogia makes fix claims

    Joe Jogia has made a series of allegations concerning match fixing in snooker in an interview with the Sunday Mirror.


    Jogia was banned for two years following an investigation into unusual betting patterns surrounding his match against Matt Selt in the Shootout last year.


    He has since been contacting journalists seeking payment for a story detailing his claims about historic corruption in the game. The Sunday Mirror does not state how much Jogia received for the interview.


    It can be read here.


    Jogia effectively admits breaching WPBSA rules on failing to report approaches to fix matches. The governing body confirms he did not pass on any information about match fixing to them.


    But this is not to say his claims should be dismissed. Snooker, like any other sport but no more than any other sport, has suffered from low level fixing and cheating, usually in matches ‘below the radar’ in qualifiers and lesser tournaments.


    Players who often haven’t earned much money are particularly susceptible to match fixing.


    The rise of internet betting makes all sports vulnerable to corruption. It is only relatively recently that snooker has taken the problem seriously enough.


    Jogia said: “You know that the people who put the bets on and hang around with these players are not nice people.”


    He is certainly right about this. On the periphery of the game there have been many dodgy characters down the years who have got their claws into players, often under the guise of ‘manager’. Players have historically been spectacularly bad at seeing through these people.


    World Snooker should introduce proper licensing of managers and stop allowing players and others to just sign in anyone they like at tournament venues.


    Players know the difference between right and wrong. They know cheating is wrong. But many of them are extremely naive and easily manipulated, usually by people in which they have put misplaced trust.


    The bedrock of any sport is its integrity. There isn’t a sport in the world that is 100% clean but that does not mean that each of them should not aspire to be clean.


    Snooker faces the same challenges as football, cricket and others when it comes to organised gambling rings, particularly in countries from which it is difficult to obtain sufficient information to make a case.


    In Nigel Mawer, World Snooker has someone determined to both root out corruption and punish the offenders.


    As Joe Jogia can testify.


    More...

  • #2
    "losing the cue ball and missing pots by a long way. It was getting quite bad... it was embarrassing, like playing against *Stevie Wonder."

    One of the problems with spot betting is that it makes it easier to 'fix' a small part of a game rather than say lose the frame or match. Many sports here in Australia (and elsewhere) are now heavily supported by betting companies through sponsorship of clubs or players. Is this really a good idea?

    Will sport move past this close connection like they did with cigarettes?

    Jogia says that he was offered 15,000 pounds (in 2010 in Germany) and said nothing because he was there to win "why would I? I am a professional sportsman"(note: the bribe was more than the winning cheque) . . .

    There to win or there to win money?
    Last edited by mythman69; 24th February 2013, 10:40 AM. Reason: added a bit extra
    My favourite players: Walter Lindrum (AUS), Neil Robertson (AUS), Eddie Charlton (AUS), Robby Foldvari (AUS), Vinnie Calabrese (AUS), Jimmy White, Stephen Hendry, Alex Higgins, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Dominic Dale and Barry Hawkins.
    I dream of a 147 (but would be happy with a 100)

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    • #3
      Snooker needs to be careful about biting the hand that feeds them. The majority of sponsors involved in the game now are betting companies, without them we simply wouldn't have a game. Snooker has never really been seen as a big sport, certainly not on a global scale, so betting is what has largely kept the game alive and sadly it will always have accusations like this attached to the sport. If the betting companies feel that snooker is corrupt they will pull out, its as simple as that. The more we hear of cases like this and the more the WSA look into claims and suspend other players then we are only likely to see the game end altogether. This whole thing with Jogia and Lee as I stated earlier this week was opening a can of worms, perhaps they should have just left things alone and accept its part of the game rather than ruin it for everyone.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmmmm, I agree that betting companies have helped to boost snooker (after the hole left by a ban on cigarette sponsorship) but the same arguments were made that snooker would die without the help of cigarette money. I wonder if perhaps another big money industry would just fill the gap. I do like the fact that I can watch streamed games on a certain betting website for free given the lack of coverage here in Australia of live matches. Anyway, food for thought . . .
        My favourite players: Walter Lindrum (AUS), Neil Robertson (AUS), Eddie Charlton (AUS), Robby Foldvari (AUS), Vinnie Calabrese (AUS), Jimmy White, Stephen Hendry, Alex Higgins, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Dominic Dale and Barry Hawkins.
        I dream of a 147 (but would be happy with a 100)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cueman View Post
          Snooker needs to be careful about biting the hand that feeds them. The majority of sponsors involved in the game now are betting companies, without them we simply wouldn't have a game. Snooker has never really been seen as a big sport, certainly not on a global scale, so betting is what has largely kept the game alive and sadly it will always have accusations like this attached to the sport. If the betting companies feel that snooker is corrupt they will pull out, its as simple as that. The more we hear of cases like this and the more the WSA look into claims and suspend other players then we are only likely to see the game end altogether. This whole thing with Jogia and Lee as I stated earlier this week was opening a can of worms, perhaps they should have just left things alone and accept its part of the game rather than ruin it for everyone.
          They have to do something about it, if it keeps happening that will ruin the sponsorship with betting companies NOT that WPBSA takes a strict policy about match fixing. If the blind eye is turned it's a message that it's safe to fool around, suspicious betting pattern are left without investigation and I bet the betting companies wouldn't like it. Accepting it is not the way to do it, in my opinion. At least they must make it look like they're taking it seriously...

          Comment


          • #6
            that was why Stephen Lee is being made a scapegoat here, just like Jogia before. Basically if your face doesn't fit in snooker then the WSA will take action. However if you are a big name and a big attraction you'll get away with stuff like this as they know that there are a lot more involved in this but it would give the sport a bad name if they were to stamp down on all of it. The trouble is they have gone after the likes of Jogia who nobody gives a damn about but without realising that he can expose all of it if he wishes because why should he suffer knowing that others are getting away with it? You either keep it quiet and accept it or clamp down on all of it, you can't have it both ways.

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            • #7
              I don't think you can accept cheating in any form .

              How is Lee being made a scapegoat ?
              Still trying to pot as many balls as i can !

              Comment


              • #8
                Cheating is cheating and I dont see it good for any sport.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by cueman View Post
                  that was why Stephen Lee is being made a scapegoat here, just like Jogia before. Basically if your face doesn't fit in snooker then the WSA will take action. However if you are a big name and a big attraction you'll get away with stuff like this as they know that there are a lot more involved in this but it would give the sport a bad name if they were to stamp down on all of it. The trouble is they have gone after the likes of Jogia who nobody gives a damn about but without realising that he can expose all of it if he wishes because why should he suffer knowing that others are getting away with it? You either keep it quiet and accept it or clamp down on all of it, you can't have it both ways.
                  I think it's a bit paranoid to claim that Lee's been made a scapegoat, we don't even know the verdict yet. Lee had a motive to do it anyway (around 2008, he wasn't playing well and evidently owed people a lot of money). I don't believe a second that Jogia didn't do it, he's saying that he's been involved in situations but all the others did the bad thing and he walked away.

                  I wouldn't make ANY sense to frame anyone, it would be the worse thing for snooker.

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