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Thread: Practice Vs Play

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Flaf View Post
    Thank you Derek for that in depth analysis, you are spot on, I've watched many a video on YT covering exactly what you are saying Although I have'nt as yet tried a Line Up, I saw TedisBill clear the table the other day, He suggested for a beginner to start with five reds from pink to blue so will try that at some point I usually put 2 reds either side of the blue, Another new routine I did recently was blue on spot and see how many times I could pot and screw back into pocket followed by following through potting blue and white in same pocket, screwing back was easier I found I only managed 11 follow throughs though.

    Regards
    John.
    The line up is useful but it is mainly to practice concentration and to some degree positional play and patterns of shots which often apply to reds in open play. For a beginner or intermediate I don't always think it's the best way to practice but it can still help of course.

    A good player will dispense with the line up as a warm up or only to concentrate properly or make sure technique is correct, it's useful for endless reps after you make a technical change for example.

    Beginners may get overwhelmed with so many balls on and just wind up being frustrated by not completing the practice, remeber it is better to practice success than practice failure at any level, this still applies to having 5 reds on as you will still require to master a variety of shots to clear.

    Instead I would personally reccomend to structure your solo play to master set shots first, we have already touched on long blues to hammer out your technique and cueing. From there I would do something simple like a 3/4 ball black off the spot, mark the cloth with a spec of chalk from your finger so you replace the cue ball in the same spot every time.

    Aim to pot the black and return the cue ball more or less to the exact spot finishing high and allowing you to play the same shot over and over again, for a beginner aiming for 5-10 successful pots and positonal attempts would be a good start. You will need to play with stun and understand how the back cushion works when you move your cue up and down the central axis of the white. At this stage side should be avoided.

    To expand you could then add a red slightly below the pink spot and your aim would be to pot the red and finish 3/4 ball high on the black to allow you to play the shot you have practiced back for position on the red just below the pink spot. You would repeat this drill from either side of the table until you can pot the black 18 out of 20 and also get the positional side.

    You could finish by attempting to pot 3 yellows in a row, playing position for the yellow each time.
    On third yellow play for the green repeat the procces of 3 greens on the third play for the brown and so on, no misses or you start again.

    So a 1-2 hour practice session might look like this:

    1. Cue over the baulk line to check your alignment and your cueing in a straight line.
    2. Attempt to achieve 8 out of 10 pot and positional on 3/4 ball black, try beat your best score each time.
    3. 6 long reds placed either side of blue spot and cue ball on the baulk line, aim to get 6 in a row.
    4. Red below the pink spot, stun repeat off the back cushion with the 3/4 ball black up for the red, aim for 8 out of 10 pot and position.
    5. 3 colours in a row clearance.

    Something like that is measurable and works all aspects of your game, as you progress in your statistics so your confidence in your game will grow and results soon appear in the frames. These routines can be adapted and expanded as you progress.

  2. #12
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    Excellent Advice again Derek, Thank you.

    Another Q if I may, My cue action feels and looks fine but I'm really struggling to get my chin low enough to touch my cue ( I dont want to Lift my cue to chin ) I think it's to do with my shoulder as it aches a hell of a lot during practice Is this a problem?

    Thanks & Regards
    John.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Flaf View Post
    Excellent Advice again Derek, Thank you.

    Another Q if I may, My cue action feels and looks fine but I'm really struggling to get my chin low enough to touch my cue ( I dont want to Lift my cue to chin ) I think it's to do with my shoulder as it aches a hell of a lot during practice Is this a problem?

    Thanks & Regards
    John.
    I'm not a coach but maybe one of the guys on here would help you.
    Also hard to say what's causing your shoulder problem without seeing you, maybe if you post a picture one of the guys can check your set up.

    I think some people can fall into a decent snooker technique naturally, many of us need to be taught at least a few things either from a good player or an experienced professional coach. My own experience is it can be worth it's weight in gold to be checked by a professional.

    I was coached by Jim Donnelly in Glasgow and I still keep in contact with him now, I also have friends I play with who are excellent players and qualified world snooker coaches so it doesn't hurt to just keep a check on your technique no matter what your level in the game you could play for 100 years and still be learning.

    Maybe look into some local coaching too, it can make a huge difference to how you play and often within a short window of time.

  4. #14
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    All duly noted Derek,, it's an old injury, I Hope to get a 'lesson' in the next week as I'm going up to Glasgow on Monday to give my cousin a hand he lives just round the corner from Masters Snooker Craigppark

    Edit: I should have said I asked my friend whos a good snooker player to stand behind me and check my arm and action he said it was fine, all in line and I think I have tennis elbow in left arm its also painful but i ignore it.
    Last edited by John Flaf; 28th March 2019 at 11:35 AM.

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