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using raw linseed oil

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  • using raw linseed oil

    Hi all
    I need your help about using linseed oil, i applied it on my cue yesterday,
    i left it for the night, i dry it using a dry cloth, then a wet & dry cloth,

    till it seems completely dry,

    but after a while it feels oily again, is there any thing i've done wrong or is it normal.

    Please can anyone reply ?
    Highest Break : 53
    Current Playing Cue : Aurora Custom Cue 1pc (56.5", 18oz, 9.5mm tip, 29mm butt)
    Spare : Aurora Custom Cue 1pc (17.8oz, 9.6mm tip, 30mm butt, 17" balance point.)
    Retired : John Parris Traditional 1pc (sold), John Parris Elite Cue (sold), Cue Craft Royal (sold), Cue Craft Baron (sold).

  • #2
    completely normal just keep drying , its the timber sweating the oil out , just wipe it off , until the cue has been through various temperatures an it will stop

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    • #3
      what i done was.

      cleaned cue with damp cloth then dried---put boiled linseed oil on...left if for a day then buffed it up

      i done this about 5 times.
      If practice makes perfect, and no one's perfect, then why practice?

      Comment


      • #4
        you shouldnt put boiled linseed oil on a cue it as driers it in which arnt good for your cue. always use raw the only problem with linseed oil is it takes along time to dry. or you could try buying some off a good cue maker i think mike wooldridge, dave coutts and craftsman cues all sell little bottles of there own blend of finishing oils on there web sites.
        Last edited by ste bed; 15 July 2010, 08:21 PM.

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        • #5
          Thanks very much
          Highest Break : 53
          Current Playing Cue : Aurora Custom Cue 1pc (56.5", 18oz, 9.5mm tip, 29mm butt)
          Spare : Aurora Custom Cue 1pc (17.8oz, 9.6mm tip, 30mm butt, 17" balance point.)
          Retired : John Parris Traditional 1pc (sold), John Parris Elite Cue (sold), Cue Craft Royal (sold), Cue Craft Baron (sold).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ste bed View Post
            you shouldnt put boiled linseed oil on a cue it as driers it in which arnt good for your cue. always use raw the only problem with linseed oil is it takes along time to dry. or you could try buying some off a good cue maker i think mike wooldridge, dave coutts and craftsman cues all sell little bottles of there own blend of finishing oils on there web sites.
            Yeah def don't use boiled linseed

            Comment


            • #7
              [QUOTE=hanchi;511091]I need your help about using linseed oil, i applied it on my cue yesterday,
              i left it for the night, i dry it using a dry cloth, then a wet & dry cloth,

              till it seems completely dry,

              but after a while it feels oily again, is there any thing i've done wrong or is it normal.
              QUOTE]

              Here is some instructions from John Parris' website:
              "Occasionally, (3-6 months depending on the amount you play) treat the cue with raw linsead oil. Wipe cue down with a damp cloth and dry. (If cue is very dirty, mild detergent can be used) do not use to much water or this can cause the cue to swell. Apply oil onto cue with a cloth or paper towel, leave overnight to soak in, buff cue with a clean cloth until smooth and dry and no residue is visible on clean cloth. Then wipe with damp cloth and dry and buff.
              "
              I think what you are getting is quite natural, it cane take days for my cue to feel just right of I have re-oiled it. As raw linseed oil does not have any artificial dryers in it (like the boiled type, which are bad for the cue) the natural drying time can seem long.
              After the initial oiling and drying time, I do use the damp cloth and then dry and buff. But if any further buffing is required I do not use the damp cloth again, only dry buffing.
              Patience and buffing dry should do the trick.
              All the best
              DeanH
              Up the TSF!

              Comment


              • #8
                well i got told to use boiled on this very forum. seems to be ok for me tho. it looked like my cue didnt have any finish on it at all, which is why i used it.

                but apart from that..every time i go for a session i use a damp cloth on it then dry str8 away and seems to feel smooth for like 5 hours without rubbing down again.

                dean...after using the oil. do you have to use a damp and dry cloth on it like me?
                If practice makes perfect, and no one's perfect, then why practice?

                Comment


                • #9
                  The problem with boiled oil is that it contains artificial driers, which are there to aid / accelerate the drying process.

                  This isn't a massive issue in itself, but, for items which are handled it can be a problem. The reason for that is because the driers in the oil are there to help the oil cure in the air, or, harden more rapidly, when in fact any heat source (like hands) can soften the driers and stop them doing what they're supposed to do. This is what causes the cue to feel really tacky, instead of the slight oily feel you can sometimes get from raw oils.

                  There are other oils available for use on things such as cues, and no, they don't have to be any particular cuemakers "SPECIAL" oil either. Read up on finishing oils online and you'll soon learn what might be best. Cuemakers will more than likely tell you that their oil is something unique and miraculous, but it isn't, it's more or less readily available.

                  Myself, I use a mix of three ingredients in my finishing oil, and it ain't anything clever at all, but it's very very effective when you know what you're doing with it.

                  But, if you're using linseed oil alone, I'd always advise raw over boiled.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    cheers trev. may i ask what oils u use?
                    If practice makes perfect, and no one's perfect, then why practice?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by WeBz View Post
                      dean...after using the oil. do you have to use a damp and dry cloth on it like me?
                      Yes I do use a damp cloth and then dry buffing after the initial oiling has dried; but unlike the original poster, I dont use the damp cloth for any subsquent buffing, only dry buffing.
                      Cheers
                      DeanH
                      Up the TSF!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        looks like ive gone wrong with using the boiled linseed then. cos i have to use a damp cloth & dry one quite regular.

                        would it make a difference if i use raw on top of boiled now?
                        If practice makes perfect, and no one's perfect, then why practice?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by WeBz View Post
                          looks like ive gone wrong with using the boiled linseed then. cos i have to use a damp cloth & dry one quite regular.

                          would it make a difference if i use raw on top of boiled now?
                          I don't think there would be any major problems, as hopefully the driers have done there job and evaporated away, so if you wait some time to apply the raw linseed there should not be any reaction.
                          Obviously I would keep any eye in the surface for any residue/secretions that may occur, depending on how much boiled linseed you applied before, but these should be easily wiped off.
                          Do not oil the cue too much (as per John Parris' website) every 3-6 months should be adequate depending on usage. I tried too much once as I had noticed a dry patch on the shaft, and only ended up with a stickier shaft than before
                          After taking my time and doing regular 3 month oiling over a 1 year period, the patch and stickiness have gone. Patience and care is the motto.
                          All the best
                          DeanH
                          Up the TSF!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            cheers dean. appreciate the info. i applied like 4 coats of it about 7 months ago. so the raw should be alright to apply now.
                            If practice makes perfect, and no one's perfect, then why practice?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sorry, do not mean to hijack this thread, but seems like the search function is not working properly... I can't even find this thread when i search for "cue oil" or "oil"! Infact, the search gave no matches???

                              I'm planning to apply cue oil to my cue for the 1st time. Got advice from a friend who says to use 1000 / 1500 / 2000 grit sandpaper to sand down the shaft first, before applying the oil.

                              Is there a need to sand the shaft? Need more advice before I mess up my cue!
                              John Lim

                              Targets to beat: -line up 63, 78 (Nov 2012)- -practice match 67 (Nov 2012)- -competition 33 (Oct 2011)-

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