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  • Wet or Dry?

    So me mate has decided to go to Q school in May. He's a bit below par these days, only hitting 60s to win frames, lol. Anyway, he's chosen to practice at one of my clubs. The match table has a 6811 TG fitted. I usually double brush, block and iron this table and he says that it's running nearly as fast as those skinny cloths at SWSA and Northern Snooker Centre.

    A few years back, we had to contend with an horrendous table and to get anything out of the 3 yr old cloth, we'd wet block the table and then iron it twice. So it got me thinking, should I wet block and iron the current match table and if I do, can I get it running as fast as a skinny 6811? Does anyone have any experience of doing this? I'd like to get conditions as close to the qually tables he's going to have to play on in May. I feel a bit wary because this cloth is pretty new.

    Cheers.
    Last edited by barrywhite; 20th January 2016, 11:08 AM.

  • #2
    "only hitting 60's to win frames".... I already know of 4/5 people he'll be able to beat then! (lots of no hopers chucking their cash away at this aren't there!)

    Not sure on the wet/dry argument, I always thought wetting the cloth was a no no but when I visited SWSA Terry Griffiths was doing exactly that. Hard to argue with Terry.
    "just tap it in"

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    • #3
      I started cleaning the four tables at my club, read a few threads on here and I'm sure I remember Geoff Large saying not to wet block these days.

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      • #4
        I decided not to wet block but I did use a fine mister while covering up the cushions. This left a really fine film on the surface that ironed off first attempt. Then a second iron to get the cloth lovely and warm, no.9 on the dowsing for pure wool, as recommended by our fitter. I have to say, it's the fastest table in our area now and as fast as a shaved 6811 Someone owns privately. Job done. Thankyou Terry Griffiths! ����
        Last edited by barrywhite; 20th January 2016, 04:44 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by barrywhite View Post
          I decided not to wet block but I did use a fine mister while covering up the cushions. This left a really fine film on the surface that ironed off first attempt. Then a second iron to get the cloth lovely and warm, no.9 on the dowsing for pure wool, as recommended by our fitter I have to say, it's the fastest table in our area now and as fast as a shaved 6811 Someone owns privately. Job done. Thankyou Terry Griffiths! ����
          Tempted to give it a go myself, I found out a fine mist spray last week but been putting off trying because of what Geoff said on the maintaining a table thread. I suppose my best bet would be to test it out on one of the tables as I wouldn't mind them being a little faster.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by markz View Post
            Tempted to give it a go myself, I found out a fine mist spray last week but been putting off trying because of what Geoff said on the maintaining a table thread. I suppose my best bet would be to test it out on one of the tables as I wouldn't mind them being a little faster.
            A few years ago, when I moved into snooker from pool, my mate and me would play league games on the worst table you can imagine, the cloth was nearly five years old, pale as a ginger and down to the threads. We'd wet block it to try and make it work. The black cushion was a trampoline and the green cushion was going that way. The owner of bar/club wouldn't invest a penny and didn't understand the game one bit; idiot. It did help wet blocking that table.

            But for this cloth I thought, it's only 6mths old, it was fitted well (I watched the chap do this to make sure lol) and still playing nicely, so maybe just a mist will be enough, i.e. no water droplets. Lo and behold it works a treat. I guess mist is somewhere in between what Geoff says and what Terry Griffiths says, so maybe it's a safe solution. I found it worked magic and the results are better than just a double iron but I guess it will depend on your cloth. If you're using a Hainsworth match cloth, the results will be less dramatic because that's a quick cloth to begin with. If you're using a precision cloth, you shouldbn't need to do it at all. If I had a Strachan club cloth, I'd wet block. lol
            Last edited by barrywhite; 20th January 2016, 05:09 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by barrywhite View Post
              A few years ago, when I moved into snooker from pool, my mate and me would play league games on the worst table you can imagine, the cloth was nearly five years old, pale as a ginger and down to the threads. We'd wet block it to try and make it work. The black cushion was a trampoline and the green cushion was going that way. The owner of bar/club wouldn't invest a penny and didn't understand the game one bit; idiot. It did help wet blocking that table.

              But for this cloth I thought, it's only 6mths old, it was fitted well (I watched the chap do this to make sure lol) and still playing nicely, so maybe just a mist will be enough, i.e. no water droplets. Lo and behold it works a treat. I guess mist is somewhere in between what Geoff says and what Terry Griffiths says, so maybe it's a safe solution. I found it worked magic and the results are better than just a double iron but I guess it will depend on your cloth. If you're using a Hainsworth match cloth, the results will be less dramatic because that's a quick cloth to begin with. If you're using a precision cloth, you shouldbn't need to do it at all. If I had a Strachan club cloth, I'd wet block. lol
              Cheers, I wasn't involved with the tables when cloths were fitted. I started cleaning them just to get some consistency, they would play differently every time I went for a knock. Think I heard one of the team captains say they had got no.10 cloth but not sure. I'll ask the fitter when I see him. I'll try the mist on the table I use mainly, I'll be able to judge if it has helped make it quicker.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by markz View Post
                Cheers, I wasn't involved with the tables when cloths were fitted. I started cleaning them just to get some consistency, they would play differently every time I went for a knock. Think I heard one of the team captains say they had got no.10 cloth but not sure. I'll ask the fitter when I see him. I'll try the mist on the table I use mainly, I'll be able to judge if it has helped make it quicker.
                After misting, I would guess that a no.10 would be as quick as a Precision but Ding and Terry Davidson are the experts on that.

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                • #9
                  Never ever ever add water to the cloth. Too much moisture in a cloth can turn chalk into a paste and when it dries the cumulative affect will turn the cloth brittle and it will wear quicker.

                  It might seem like a short term benefit, as a wet cloth will slide a bit more, but the long term damage offsets that benefit.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pottr View Post
                    Never ever ever add water to the cloth. Too much moisture in a cloth can turn chalk into a paste and when it dries the cumulative affect will turn the cloth brittle and it will wear quicker.

                    It might seem like a short term benefit, as a wet cloth will slide a bit more, but the long term damage offsets that benefit.
                    I had a look back at the maintenance thread and Geoff Large says the same thing. As the tables don't belong to me I think I'll leave my spray at home. I reckon tables running slower just from this cold damp spell, club don't keep the rooms heated 24/7.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pottr View Post
                      Never ever ever add water to the cloth. Too much moisture in a cloth can turn chalk into a paste and when it dries the cumulative affect will turn the cloth brittle and it will wear quicker.

                      It might seem like a short term benefit, as a wet cloth will slide a bit more, but the long term damage offsets that benefit.
                      You don't leave it wet lad, you iron it twice afterwards so that it's not only dry but warm, i.e. less moisture than when you started. As for wear and tear, even a 6811 TG with light use ain't much good after 12mths, tracking at the pockets can't be avoided.

                      Not sure about turning chalk into a paste. As you know when the cloth comes off, the chalk is underneath. If you brush the bloth properly before blocking, the should be little chalk on the surface and the surface is where the mist lands.

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                      • #12
                        Wet or Dry?

                        Geoff Large - 40 years fitting experience, I'll take his advice.

                        You used to sing delicious ballads, pal. Leave snooker to the ones with experience x

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pottr View Post
                          Geoff Large - 40 years fitting experience, I'll take his advice.

                          You used to sing delicious ballads, pal. Leave snooker to the ones with experience x
                          Terry Griffiths, WS coach and World Champion apparently advocates wet blocking. Geoff Large, Riley's fitter. I'll take both their advice and go the mid way with misting. Wisdom is a fine thing.

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                          • #14
                            One thing that makes damping cloth a questionable thing

                            why do they have heaters under the table ?

                            the answer is to keep moisture content down and by doing this the cloth plays faster , so why damp or fine mist the cloth ?

                            If you read my thread on why I think damping is bad you will also get some pointers from that , most do it to bring the colour back into the cloth and that is the main reason really it has no other benefits
                            [/SIGPIC]http://www.gclbilliards.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Geoff Large View Post
                              One thing that makes damping cloth a questionable thing

                              why do they have heaters under the table ?

                              the answer is to keep moisture content down and by doing this the cloth plays faster , so why damp or fine mist the cloth ?

                              If you read my thread on why I think damping is bad you will also get some pointers from that , most do it to bring the colour back into the cloth and that is the main reason really it has no other benefits
                              Would you consider doing a video Geoff of brushing, blocking and ironing a table. If more players knew how to do this clubs would have better conditions and maybe more players would stay in the game. A freshly cleaned table makes a hell of a difference.

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