Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Basic Snooker Flaws & How to Fix Them

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Basic Snooker Flaws & How to Fix Them

    For past few weeks I was facing trouble making long pots. Whenever, I got down to make long pot, I miss it by few cms to few inches almost every time. At first, I thought as I am playing soft shot, there might be some roll on the cloth but even with faster shots I faced similar issue.

    After that I went back to basic with Baulk to Top - Dot to Dot - Cue Ball up-down hit - As Steve Davis suggest to practice every time before starting game. I realized that even here the cue ball was deviating from its target and thus left/right spin was induced w/o my knowledge.

    I finally narrowed down few flaws in my game that were the reasons behind it and am seeking help to remove them.

    FLAW 1: - NOT ABLE TO BRIDGE DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF THE CENTER OF THE BALL
    I have realized that while getting down to the shot, I sometime unknowingly don't bridge properly in front of the center of the cue ball and the bridge is a thread or 2 left of the center. As I try to hit the ball center, but the bridge is not center, the cue stick doesn't make a straight line and thus on hitting, the ball travels to the right (as bridge is on the left side) and longer the shot is..more prominent the deviation of the ball will be.

    MY QUESTION - How to make sure that my bridge is always placed properly in front of the center of the ball?

    FLAW 2: - NOT ABLE TO KEEP TRACK OF THE POINT OF CONTACT ON THE OBJECT BALL
    I am able to find the point of contact (to hit the object ball) to pot is..which is straight line pass though the pot. The thing is, keeping track of that particular point is bit difficult (at least for me). Since the object ball, lets say red ball, is entirely solid, after deciding on the point of contact, when I go back to make a stance of bridge, the point is somehow mixed up the solid color and I get confused where I was planning to hit and sometimes hit it wrong.
    While playing pool, I don't face this issue much as half of the balls are stripes so once the point of contact is decided, I am able to keep track it. Half of the solid balls still have numbers on them so it is still bit easier to keep track of the place where you want to hit. Plus as the table size is small and balls size is large, this is not as difficult as it becomes while playing snooker.

    MY QUESTION - How do I make sure that I don't get confused on my object ball point of contact and make the stance and hit the ball just right?

    FLAW 3: - MAKING CUE STICK IN STRAIGHT LINE WHILE FEATHERING
    While feathering, if I feather once/twice, I am able to keep my cue stick straight but more features I perform, the cue stick starts deviating more and more. I am sure it has something to do with my cue action. Either my back arm is not in the right direction or some similar problem must be there. If I try to keep my cue stick closed to chest to check on straight line to-fro motion, after few minutes my shoulders start aching. This deviation become more prominent if my bridge is placed at larger distance behind the cue ball.

    MY QUESTION - Is there a way to make sure that my cue action remain straight no matter how many times I feather, especially when my bridge hand is placed 12/15 inches or more behind the cue ball.

    Lastly, Although Ronnie is my favorite snooker player but I am really impressed with Ding Junhui cue action. People say Shaun Murphy has the best cue action but I am really impressed with Ding's cue action and feathering technique...simply flawless and elegant. Ding's cue actions is almost a robot like, just straight and pin point and everytime impeccable. I wonder how he has made perfected it!
    Last edited by _Harry_Potter_; 31st August 2015, 06:11 AM.
    I Admire Ding, Adore Judd & Would do ANYTHING to play like Ronnie.

  • #2
    Originally posted by _Harry_Potter_ View Post
    I wonder how he has made perfected it!
    Endless, lonely and painful hours of practise

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by _Harry_Potter_ View Post

      MY QUESTION - How to make sure that my bridge is always placed properly in front of the center of the ball?

      MY QUESTION - How do I make sure that I don't get confused on my object ball point of contact and make the stance and hit the ball just right?

      MY QUESTION - Is there a way to make sure that my cue action remain straight no matter how many times I feather, especially when my bridge hand is placed 12/15 inches or more behind the cue ball.
      the baulk line. work on cueing straight along the baulk line , just like you would in normal play. do this for 15mins before you pot a ball, an keep coming back to it. if it dont transform your game within a few weeks i will give you your money back.
      all the best players have an still do practice this

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by j6uk View Post
        all the best players have an still do practice this
        can really see O'Sullivan doing this.... not
        #jeSuisMasterBlasterBarryWhite2v1977Luclex(andHisF ictiousTwin)BigSplash!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by j6uk View Post
          the baulk line. work on cueing straight along the baulk line , just like you would in normal play. do this for 15mins before you pot a ball, an keep coming back to it. if it dont transform your game within a few weeks i will give you your money back.
          all the best players have an still do practice this

          How much money back?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jono* View Post
            How much money back?
            thought that would make some put their ears on.. i might have to do a video demo for, no not the sisters, but the doubters and people who are alittle unsure how it works

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bolton-cueman View Post
              can really see O'Sullivan doing this.... not
              Agreed no chance, he might've done when he was 9

              Comment


              • #8
                It's the first thing I do when I get to a table. Up and down the spots to check my cueing, and try to get a feel for the pace of the table. I'm no Ronnie.

                Only need to do it a couple of times. It's a great easy indicator of a number of things (aim, centre ball striking, no unintentional side, pace of the table). If I can put the white on the blue spot, off two cushions, I'm generally in good shape. (generally I can't!)

                Comment


                • #9
                  cueing along the baulk line is also the best routine for the kitchen table at home. it's also good for developing a feeling when the body is very still

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tetricky View Post
                    It's the first thing I do when I get to a table. Up and down the spots to check my cueing, and try to get a feel for the pace of the table. I'm no Ronnie.

                    Only need to do it a couple of times. It's a great easy indicator of a number of things (aim, centre ball striking, no unintentional side, pace of the table). If I can put the white on the blue spot, off two cushions, I'm generally in good shape. (generally I can't!)
                    Clear the colours up to to get used to the speed of the table

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Would the difference in height of a kitchen table make a difference? As for cueing practice, you can draw a straight line on a piece of paper to replicate it or along a straight edge

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isBhIEwkabQ

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          yes the height difference is an issue, but not that bad.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tetricky View Post
                            It's the first thing I do when I get to a table. Up and down the spots to check my cueing, and try to get a feel for the pace of the table. I'm no Ronnie.

                            Only need to do it a couple of times. It's a great easy indicator of a number of things (aim, centre ball striking, no unintentional side, pace of the table). If I can put the white on the blue spot, off two cushions, I'm generally in good shape. (generally I can't!)

                            I'm confused , is this not an exercise where you don't use any balls you just use the baulk line to see if the cue is going through straight?
                            This is how i read what J6 meant so you wouldn't be able to see how the speed of the table is, if this is not correct could somebody explain what the baulk line test is then please
                            It's hard to pot balls with a Chimpanzee tea party going on in your head

                            Wibble

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GeordieDS View Post
                              I'm confused , is this not an exercise where you don't use any balls you just use the baulk line to see if the cue is going through straight?
                              This is how i read what J6 meant so you wouldn't be able to see how the speed of the table is, if this is not correct could somebody explain what the baulk line test is then please
                              Cueing along the baulkline is done without balls. Use the brown spot as a ball and address it there and then start SLOWLY and cue back and forth watching the ferrule of the cue. If you keep it slow it becomes easier to keep everything straight, so back and forth slowly. Try and use a longer backswing and slowly deliver the cue all the way until your grip hand touches your chest.

                              Then increase the speed of the DELIVERY but not the backswing. Note if the cue still covers the baulkline. Repeat maybe 10 times. If the cue deviates off the baulkline then slow it back down again.
                              Terry Davidson
                              IBSF Master Coach & Examiner

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X