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Ferrules and Throw and Spin

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  • #61
    Love these topics,cue ball throw with side is obviously a fact but the reasons for it is what's being debated.having played with and made countless numbers of cues I have my own views of what's occurring and they have never let me down so far,all I will say some of the reasons stated are for the most part correct but there is a little more to it than first seems.any experiments to bottom it would be pointless unless all the variables were equal which they are not,you can alter the playing characteristics of a single cue by changing the ferrule,the flex,the tip,the weight etc but they might not have the same desired effect on another cue.some cues are so bad they are beyond improving and likewise there are (rarely) cues that are such good hitters that they will stand loads of tinkering before they lose it.that's why there is such opposite views it is based on their own personal experiences which reflects the different cues they play with

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    • #62
      http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/~cros....%20squirt.pdf

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      • #63
        Or... "the experimental data
        shows that elasticity of the cue tip plays a dominant role in
        the collision process and suggests that cues with thin shafts
        might generate lower squirt angles as a result of their greater
        flexibility rather than their lower mass."

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        • #64
          Originally posted by canadianone View Post
          Or... "the experimental data
          shows that elasticity of the cue tip plays a dominant role in
          the collision process and suggests that cues with thin shafts
          might generate lower squirt angles as a result of their greater
          flexibility rather than their lower mass."
          Yes, with cue shafts being quite similar, usually made out of ash, the two factors in snooker that are more variable are the ferrule and tip. I believe both play a part.

          An interesting thing happened yesterday with 'Prof', my coach. He handed me his Glover maple. Now this cue should have imparted more throw, due to the stiffness of the maple compared to ash but low and behold, it hardly threw at all when we were working on the break-off (where the balls hit the cushions and magic back into a triangle pack, what a trick that is). In contrast, my ash cue (with a ferrule that is pretty average, not thick or thin) threw the cue ball a whole ball to the side. This was astounding. Prof says this is down to the tip I was using, a Kamui Black M. He believes these were designed for the hard hitting of US 9 ball and of course, he has a point, Kamui were the pioneers of the best pool tips. He thinks them unsuitable for snooker. He shaves off 2mm of the bottom of an elk which he reckons saves it from being spongy and soft and glues it on with gel. Nothing magic about it at all, just a standard elk out of a box. He didn't say much about my view that the number of bad ones outweighs the good ones in a box, only to say that he'd never go down the laminate route after trying a Talisman tip.

          This got me thinking hard. Because when it comes to unintentional or intentional side, he's got more chance of the making the pot with a non-throwing elk than a laminate.

          So how much do we think an elk throws compared to a BDP/Kamui/Talisman/ADR147 etc? What is your experience?

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