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2019 Welsh Open

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  • bobmikeking
    replied
    I thought the same, I saw some pictures on his twitter that are only a couple of years old and he looks much younger. It looks like the hair loss has really aged him.

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  • DeanH
    replied
    Originally posted by Odrl View Post
    I would never guess that Vafaei is only 24 just by looking at him. He looks old enough to be my father.
    Met him last year and as you say he does not look like he was 23, nice young man

    Like Jackson Page, even with the trimmed beard, he does not appear to be 16 (was that last year?)

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  • Odrl
    replied
    I would never guess that Vafaei is only 24 just by looking at him. He looks old enough to be my father.

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  • bobmikeking
    replied
    Originally posted by Cue crafty View Post
    Just caught up on the match from last night. Great performance from Joe O'Connor, cool calm and very very focused. Nice to see John congratulate him so warmly just sums up the performance.

    Interesting cue Joe is using, anyone else noticed what looks like a butt joint at the end?
    It is a bit of black tape used as a marker for his hand, Akani does the same thing with green tape.

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  • Odrl
    replied
    Four centuries from Bingham again today, that makes it 10 in the tournament. I wonder what the record is for tournaments that use this format.

    Edit: I'm pretty sure the Home Nations record is O'Sullivan's 12 in the 2017 English Open, so Bingham needs three more in the final to break that. The table has been playing quite easy this week, so I think he has a pretty good chance.
    Last edited by Odrl; 16th February 2019, 04:57 PM.

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  • Billy
    replied
    I do wish WT would stop blaming the table for the players' errors. This man really does talk through his backside!

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  • Odrl
    replied
    That was a pretty horrendous frame of snooker. Much more scrappy than I expected so far, considering how well both players played yesterday.

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  • JimMalone
    replied
    Nervy start from both.

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  • JimMalone
    replied
    Originally posted by Odrl View Post
    Yes, I believe "č" is basically the same in all the languages that use it, and it almost always gets lost in "translation". For instance, a couple of weeks ago I've read some complaints about how our ski-jumping commentator pronounces the name "Vančura", because he keeps saying it with a "c" instead of a "č", and then someone defended him by basically blaming it on the TV graphics. I think that's a good point actually, because there is no way he would be making that mistake if the name was spelled in its original form.

    I think this subtlety is easier to get right in Russian names, because the equivalent of "č" in their Cyrillic alphabet is usually translated as "ch" or "tch" to avoid any confusion in English. The name "Tchaikovsky", for example, only has 10 letters in the Russian alphabet, because only one is needed to represent the "Tch" sound at the beginning. In Slovenian it is spelled as "Čajkovski", so it actually goes down to 9 letters.

    On the other hand, the Polish way of spelling the "č" sound, in the name Adam Kszczot for example, just makes my head hurt.

    On a related subject, some languages like Croatian and Serbian also use the letter "ć", which is pronounced slightly differently, but in Slovenian this subtlety is usually lost. For instance, names that end in -ić would just be pronounced as if they ended in -ič by commentators on TV, but people from countries that actually use both of these letters would always make the distinction.
    In german Tschaikowsky therefore is even stretched to 12 letters

    Oh yes, Polish really is something different. Don't get me started on their Ł's.

    Yeah, I also always probably pronounce -ić (way more common for us german speakers with all the croatian and serbian names) the same way as -ič. But I'm also the first one to admit that I've absolutely no talent for languages.

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  • Odrl
    replied
    Originally posted by JimMalone View Post
    Yeah, I think the "č" is quite similiar in most slavic languages. Whether it is AleŇ° Čeh in Slovenia or Petr Čech in Czechia, isn't it?
    Yes, I believe "č" is basically the same in all the languages that use it, and it almost always gets lost in "translation". For instance, a couple of weeks ago I've read some complaints about how our ski-jumping commentator pronounces the name "Vančura", because he keeps saying it with a "c" instead of a "č", and then someone defended him by basically blaming it on the TV graphics. I think that's a good point actually, because there is no way he would be making that mistake if the name was spelled in its original form.

    I think this subtlety is easier to get right in Russian names, because the equivalent of "č" in their Cyrillic alphabet is usually translated as "ch" or "tch" to avoid any confusion in English. The name "Tchaikovsky", for example, only has 10 letters in the Russian alphabet, because only one is needed to represent the "Tch" sound at the beginning. In Slovenian it is spelled as "Čajkovski", so it actually goes down to 9 letters.

    On the other hand, the Polish way of spelling the "č" sound, in the name Adam Kszczot for example, just makes my head hurt.

    On a related subject, some languages like Croatian and Serbian also use the letter "ć", which is pronounced slightly differently, but in Slovenian this subtlety is usually lost. For instance, names that end in -ić would just be pronounced as if they ended in -ič by commentators on TV, but people from countries that actually use both of these letters would always make the distinction.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cue crafty
    replied
    Just caught up on the match from last night. Great performance from Joe O'Connor, cool calm and very very focused. Nice to see John congratulate him so warmly just sums up the performance.

    Interesting cue Joe is using, anyone else noticed what looks like a butt joint at the end?
    Last edited by Cue crafty; 16th February 2019, 12:49 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimMalone
    replied
    Originally posted by Odrl View Post
    There is a lovely website where you can find the correct pronunciation of most famous people:

    https://forvo.com/word/peter_prevc/#sl

    Just make sure the person saying the name is from the same country.

    Basically, the letter "v" turns into an "u" here, but that does not cause it to be pronounced like in the name "Freund". You would have to spell it "Projc" for that to happen.

    The letter "c" is always a "ts" sound in Slovenian, it never turns into a "k" or a "ch". This can be confusing though, because our alphabet also has the letter "č" (a "ch" sound, like in the English word "change"), but it is almost always displayed as a "c" in TV graphics, so there is no way for people to tell the difference. This actually annoys me a little, because we are in the 21st century and should be able to use the correct spelling for non-English names in sports broadcasts, but that's another matter...
    Thank you!
    So our commentators actually pronounce him correctly. Always seemed strange to me to make it to an u.

    Yeah, I think the "č" is quite similiar in most slavic languages. Whether it is Aleš Čeh in Slovenia or Petr Čech in Czechia, isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Odrl
    replied
    Originally posted by DeanH View Post
    Diacritics
    or simply "accents"
    Wikipedia has a good explanation of the variants
    Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Odrl
    replied
    Originally posted by JimMalone View Post
    I've always wondered how you pronounce the name Prevc correctly. Can you solve this for me please?
    There is a lovely website where you can find the correct pronunciation of most famous people:

    https://forvo.com/word/peter_prevc/#sl

    Just make sure the person saying the name is from the same country.

    Basically, the letter "v" turns into an "u" here, but that does not cause it to be pronounced like in the name "Freund". You would have to spell it "Projc" for that to happen.

    The letter "c" is always a "ts" sound in Slovenian, it never turns into a "k" or a "ch". This can be confusing though, because our alphabet also has the letter "č" (a "ch" sound, like in the English word "change"), but it is almost always displayed as a "c" in TV graphics, so there is no way for people to tell the difference. This actually annoys me a little, because we are in the 21st century and should be able to use the correct spelling for non-English names in sports broadcasts, but that's another matter...

    Leave a comment:


  • DeanH
    replied
    Originally posted by Odrl View Post
    ... this, because they are kind enough to always use marks (no idea what they are called in English )
    Diacritics
    or simply "accents"
    Wikipedia has a good explanation of the variants

    Leave a comment:

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